The information contained herein is updated as of today's date.
Rocky Mountain Farmers Union

HB22-1013 Microgrids For Community Resilience Grant Program 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Microgrids For Community Resilience Grant Program
Sponsors: R. Pelton (R) | M. Snyder (D) / D. Hisey (R) | F. Winter (D)
Summary:

The bill creates the microgrids for community resilience grant program (grant program) to be administered by the division of local government (division) in the department of local affairs (department), in collaboration with the Colorado resiliency office (office) in the division and the Colorado energy office . A cooperative electric association or a municipally owned utility (utility) may apply to the division for a grant award to finance the purchase of microgrid resources in eligible rural communities within the utility's service territory that are at significant risk of severe weather or natural disaster events and in which there are one or more community anchor institutions. The microgrids, which can be connected to or be disconnected from, and work independent of, the utility's electric grid, can increase an eligible rural community's resilience regarding any interruptions to the electric grid, such as those caused by severe weather or natural disaster events. On an annual basis commencing in 2023 , the division is required to report on the progress of the grant program, submit copies of the report to the house of representatives energy and environment committee and the senate transportation and energy committee, or their successor committees, and publish the report on the department's website.For state fiscal year 2022-23, the bill appropriates from the general fund:

  • $3,500,000 to the department of local affairs for use by the division of local government for implementation of the grant program; and
  • $20,713 to the office of the governor for use by the Colorado energy office for grant program administration.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1016 Voluntary Contribution Check-off Feeding Colorado 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Voluntary Contribution Check-off Feeding Colorado
Sponsors: T. Carver (R) | B. McLachlan (D) / D. Hisey (R) | R. Fields (D)
Summary:

The bill creates the Feeding Colorado fund (fund) in the state treasury. A voluntary contribution designation line for the fund will appear on the state individual income tax return form (form) for the 5 income tax years following the year that the executive director of the department of revenue (department) certifies to the revisor of statutes that there is space available on the form and that the fund is next in the queue.

Once the fund is placed on the form, the department is directed to determine annually the total amount contributed to the fund and report that amount to the state treasurer and the general assembly. The state treasurer is required to credit that amount to the fund, and the general assembly appropriates from the fund to the department the costs of administering money designated for the fund. After that amount is deducted, the money remaining in the fund at the end of a fiscal year is transferred to Feeding Colorado.

Following the statutory 2-year grace period for new tax check-offs, the fund is required to achieve the minimum contribution amount of $50,000 per year to remain on the form.

The fund is repealed on the sixth income tax year following the year in which the director files the certification, unless it is continued by the general assembly before then.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/14/2022 Sent to the Governor
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1025 Repeal Of Infrequently Used Tax Expenditures 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Repeal Of Infrequently Used Tax Expenditures
Sponsors: A. Benavidez (D) / C. Kolker (D)
Summary:

Legislative Oversight Committee Concerning Tax Policy. The bill repeals the following tax expenditures:

  • The exemption from the insurance premium tax for educational and scientific institution life insurance ( section 1 of the bill);
  • The alternative minimum income tax based on annual gross receipts from sales in or into the state ( sections 2 and 4 );
  • The income tax credit for investment in technologies for recycling plastics ( section 3 );
  • The income tax credit for crop or livestock contributions to a charitable organization ( section 4 );
  • The income tax deduction for income or gain for a C corporation that was taxed prior to 1965, to the extent it is included in current taxable income ( section 5 );
  • Income tax credits for qualifying investments ( sections 6 and 7 );
  • The sales and use tax exemption for the transfer of complimentary promotional materials to an out-of-state vendee ( section 8 ); and
  • The requirement that a portion of a state-employed chaplain's salary is designated as a rental allowance ( section 9 ). and
  • The excise tax exemption for sacramental wines sold and used for religious purposes ( section 12 ). This section also specifies that a religious organization that distributes sacramental wines for religious purposes is not subject to licensing and other regulatory requirements.

Sections 10 and 11 make conforming amendments.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/29/2022 Signed by the President of the Senate
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1053 Blockchain Agriculture And Uniform Commercial Code 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Blockchain Agriculture And Uniform Commercial Code
Sponsors: D. Valdez (D) | T. Van Beber (R) / C. Hansen (D)
Summary:

In 2019, the general assembly enacted House Bill 19-1247, which created an advisory group to study the use and benefits of blockchain technology in agriculture. The group issued a report that included the following recommendations:

  • That the legislature authorize the design, development, and deployment of an online program for agricultural producers to learn about the use and benefits of implementing new digital, data-driven systems to facilitate trade in agricultural products; and
  • That the legislature amend the Colorado "Uniform Commercial Code" (UCC) to protect ownership and control of digital information assets generated by agricultural producers in a manner similar to the changes adopted by Wyoming.

To implement the recommendations:

  • Section 1 of the bill instructs the commissioner of agriculture (commissioner) to create and deploy an online program that educates agricultural producers about blockchain technology. The commissioner will consult and cooperate with stakeholders to develop the online program, publicize the program, and encourage agricultural producers to participate in the program.
  • Section 2 :

  • Classifies the various types of digital assets as the appropriate type of property, security, or asset under the UCC;
  • Classifies a bank providing custodial services of a digital asset as a securities intermediary;
  • Establishes that control of a digital asset is the functional equivalent of possessing a physical asset for the purposes of perfecting a security interest in the digital asset;
  • Requires an agreement for a secured party to take control of a digital asset;
  • Clarifies that a secured party may file with the secretary of state a financing statement to perfect a security interest in proceeds from a digital asset;
  • Provides that a transferee takes a digital asset free of any security interest 2 years after the transferee takes the asset for value if the transferee does not have actual notice of an adverse claim; and
  • Clarifies issues of court jurisdiction over digital assets.

To implement the bill, $72,768 is appropriated from the general fund to the department of agriculture for use by the agricultural markets division.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/5/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1068 Medicaid Reimbursement For Therapy Using Equines 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Medicaid Reimbursement For Therapy Using Equines
Sponsors: K. McCormick (D) | M. Lynch (R) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D)
Summary:

Subject to federal authorization and federal financial participation, on or after January 1, 2023 July 1, 2024 , medicaid reimbursement is available for therapy using equine movement when provided by a physical therapist, an occupational therapist, or a speech-language pathologist.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/20/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1072 Habitat Partnership Program 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Habitat Partnership Program
Sponsors: P. Will (R) | D. Roberts (D) / K. Donovan (D) | C. Simpson (R)
Summary:

The habitat partnership program (program) assists the division of parks and wildlife (division) with reducing wildlife conflicts and meeting game management objectives. Section 1 of the bill:

  • Authorizes the director of the division (director) to independently appoint members of the habitat partnership council (council) that, in part, advises local habitat partnership committees (committees) that help implement program objectives;
  • Expands the scope of the program to assist the division with private land conservation and wildlife migration corridor efforts;
  • With respect to reducing wildlife conflicts, prioritizes conflicts that arise from forage and fence issues related to big game ungulate species, which are big game species that are hooved mammals;
  • Authorizes the council to allocate an annual budget to each committee, subject to final approval by the director, and expend funds in areas of the state that are not covered by a committee;
  • Requires the director to set terms for committee members; and
  • Identifies the council and each committee as an independent organizational unit for purposes of purchasing, accounting, and procurement-related issues.

Section 2 clarifies that any balance of unexpended and unencumbered money in the habitat partnership cash fund (fund) at the end of a fiscal year that exceeds the amount transferred to the fund at the beginning of the fiscal year from the wildlife cash fund reverts to the wildlife cash fund. Section 2 also continues the fund indefinitely. Section 3 exempts the program from the "Procurement Code".
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/19/2022 Sent to the Governor
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1092 Loans From Irrigation Districts To Landowners 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Loans From Irrigation Districts To Landowners
Sponsors: M. Soper (R) | D. Roberts (D) / J. Bridges (D) | D. Coram (R)
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill allows a board of directors of an irrigation district (board) to borrow money, which the irrigation district may use to make loans to landowners to be used to make improvements to private water delivery systems or for other types of projects that improve:

  • Water conservation or efficiencies on landowner property; or
  • Landowner delivery or drainage systems.

An obligation or contract to borrow such money is exempt from the existing requirement that a contract purporting to bind the district to pay any sum in excess of $500,000 must be ratified by a majority of all the votes cast at a general or special election. Additionally, the district cannot assess landowners to raise money to fund the loans.

In case of default in the payment of any loan installment, the county treasurer may assess upon the eligible real property a tax lien for the payment of the whole of the unpaid installment; except that, the county treasurer shall not assess a tax lien for the entire value of the landowner's portion of the irrigation loan issued by the water district.

A board may adopt rules concerning the issuance of loans to landowners.

Section 2 requires each irrigation district to include in its annual appropriation resolution all amounts payable by landowners to the irrigation district in accordance with loans issued to the landowners and indicate the amount payable by each tract within the irrigation district for which a landowner has received a loan.Section 3 requires a county assessor, in assessing land within an irrigation district, to:

  • Apply the information provided in the irrigation district's annual appropriation resolution concerning loans issued to landowners; and
  • Assess the additional amount payable for each tract for which the landowner has received a loan.

Section 3 states that the county treasurer will receive $5 per tract assessed for loans issued to landowners by an irrigation district, and this $5 will be assessed against each participating tract.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/12/2022 Governor Signed
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1151 Turf Replacement Program 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News: Legislation would help Coloradans replace turf with water-saving landscaping
Legislation would help Coloradans replace turf with water-saving landscaping
Short Title: Turf Replacement Program
Sponsors: M. Catlin (R) | D. Roberts (D) / J. Bridges (D) | C. Simpson (R)
Summary:

The bill requires the Colorado water conservation board (board) to develop a statewide program to provide financial incentives for the voluntary replacement of irrigated turf with water-wise landscaping (turf replacement program). The bill defines water-wise landscaping as a water- and plant-management practice that emphasizes using plants with lower water needs. Local governments, certain districts, Native American tribes, and nonprofit organizations with their own turf replacement programs may apply to the board for money to help finance their turf replacement programs. The board will contract with one or more third parties to administer one or more turf replacement programs in areas where local turf replacement programs do not exist.

The state treasurer is required to transfer $2 million from the general fund to the turf replacement fund, which fund is created to finance the turf replacement program. The money is appropriated to the department of natural resources for use by the board to implement the turf replacement program, with $11,400 of the money reappropriated to the office of the governor for use by the office of information technology to provide information technology services to the department of natural resources.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1159 Waste Diversion And Circular Economy Development Center 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Waste Diversion And Circular Economy Development Center
Sponsors: L. Cutter (D) / K. Priola (R) | F. Winter (D)
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill makes legislative findings and declarations. Section 2 creates the circular economy development center (center) in the department of public health and environment (department). The purpose of the center is to grow existing markets; create new markets; and provide necessary infrastructure, logistics, and marketing to create a sustainable circular economy for recycled commodities in Colorado. On or before July 1, 2023, subject to available appropriations, the department must contract with a third-party administrator to operate the center.

The center must conduct a statewide, end-market gap analysis and opportunity assessment and submit a final report of the analysis and assessment to the department by August 1, 2024. Beginning September 1, 2023, and on or before each September 1 thereafter, the center must also submit a report to the department describing the progress of the center. The department must include the report in its annual presentation to the general assembly pursuant to the "State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act".

Section 2 also repeals the center, effective September 1, 2030. Before the repeal, the activities of the center are scheduled for a sunset review by the department of regulatory agencies.Section 3 requires the front range waste diversion enterprise (enterprise), in coordination with the department, to pay for direct and indirect costs associated with the operation of the center through the front range waste diversion cash fund (fund). Section 3 also makes changes to the front range waste diversion enterprise grant program as follows:

  • Current law imposes limitations for grant applications that are received from a waste hauler or a landfill owner or operator. Specifically, as to the portions of such an application that relate to infrastructure or equipment, only 50% of infrastructure or equipment can be funded through the grant program and, if the board awards a grant to a waste hauler or landfill owner or operator for infrastructure or equipment, the grantee is ineligible to receive a grant for the following 5 years. The bill removes these limitations.
  • Current law prohibits the board of directors of the enterprise from allocating more than 20% of the annual fund revenue in any single grant award. The bill raises this maximum to 50%.

Section 3 also extends the repeal date of the enterprise from September 1, 2029, to September 1, 2030.Sections 4 and 5 extend the repeal dates of the recycling resources economic opportunity program and the associated recycling resources economic opportunity fund from July 1, 2026, to September 1, 2030. Section 4 also requires the department to use money appropriated from the recycling resources economic opportunity fund to pay for up to 40% of the direct and indirect costs associated with the operation of the center.

Under current law, the solid waste user fee is repealed, effective July 1, 2026. Section 6 extends Section 5 eliminates this repeal date. to September 1, 2030. Section 6 Section 5 also extends, from September 1, 2029, to September 1, 2030, the repeal date of a specific user fee that is associated with the solid waste user fee.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/5/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1235 Sunset Continue Regulation Of Veterinary Practice 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Sunset Continue Regulation Of Veterinary Practice
Sponsors: K. McCormick (D) | M. Catlin (R) / J. Ginal (D)
Summary:

Sunset Process - House Agriculture, Livestock, and Water Committee. The bill implements recommendations of the department of regulatory agencies, as specified in the department's sunset review of and report on the "Colorado Veterinary Practice Act" (practice act), as follows:

  • Continues the practice act for 11 years, until September 1, 2033 ( sections 1 and 2 of the bill);
  • Requires a veterinarian to notify the board of veterinary medicine (board) if the veterinarian suffers from a physical illness or condition or a behavioral or mental health disorder that renders the veterinarian unable to practice with reasonable skill and safety ( section 6 );
  • Repeals the requirement that the board send a letter of admonition by certified mail ( section 14 );
  • Requires veterinarians to create a written plan for the storage, security, and disposal of patient records ( section 18 ); and
  • If the board has reasonable cause to believe a veterinarian is unable to practice with reasonable skill and safety due to a physical condition, authorizes the board to order the veterinarian to submit to an examination and to suspend the veterinarian's license for failing to comply with the board's order ( section 20 ).

The bill makes other amendments to the practice act as follows:

  • Authorizes a person who is not a licensed veterinarian in this state to administer rabies vaccinations in a clinic setting under direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian, or through the indirect supervision of a licensed veterinarian if the person is working on behalf of an animal shelter for shelter-owned animals ( sections 9 and 22 );
  • Adds two members to the board who are veterinary technicians ( section 10 );
  • Requires credit hours of practice act jurisprudence as part of veterinarians' continuing education program and permits veterinarians to take nonbiomedical courses as part of the program ( section 12 );
  • Repeals and reenacts the veterinary peer health assistance program to reorganize existing provisions, to allow veterinary technicians access to the program and to require veterinary professionals, including veterinary technicians, to self-refer to the program upon arrest for a drug- or alcohol-related crime ( section 19 ); and
  • Creates the veterinary professional assistance program funded through licensing fees to provide counseling, education, coaching, and other services, as requested, to veterinarians and veterinary technicians concerning issues including physical and mental health and wellness, workplace concerns, and legal and financial issues ( section 19 ).

Section 21 creates the regulation of veterinary technicians. Effective January 1, 2024, a person who practices as a veterinary technician in this state must be registered by the board. To be registered, a person must have been certified by a national body. For an individual who is not yet nationally certified but who has been practicing as a veterinary technician, the board may issue a provisional registration of limited duration under specified circumstances. Veterinary technicians are subject to discipline by the board for engaging in conduct that is grounds for discipline.Section 21 gives title protection to veterinary technicians and grants standard registration, rule-making, and disciplinary powers to the board. Section 21 repeals the regulation of veterinary technicians on September 1, 2033, subject to and consistent with the sunset review of the practice act.Sections 22 through 29 replace "humane society" with "animal shelter" to update and make terminology consistent in statute.Sections 3 through 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, and 13 through 17 amend existing provisions throughout the practice act to include veterinary technicians, as applicable, and make other conforming amendments.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/5/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1249 Electric Grid Resilience And Reliability Roadmap 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Electric Grid Resilience And Reliability Roadmap
Sponsors: T. Bernett (D) | E. Hooton (D) / B. Rankin (R) | C. Hansen (D)
Summary:

The bill requires the Colorado energy office (office), in collaboration with the department of local affairs (department) and the Colorado resiliency office (resiliency office), to develop a grid resilience and reliability roadmap (roadmap) for improving the resilience and reliability of electric grids in the state (grid), which roadmap must include guidance on how microgrids may be used to harden the grid, improve grid resilience and reliability, and help serve communities' electricity needs independent of the grid deliver electricity where extending distribution infrastructure may not be practicable, and operate autonomously and independent of the grid, when necessary . In developing the roadmap, the office, department, and resiliency office are required to engage interested persons throughout the state in stakeholder meetings and consider stakeholder input. The roadmap may identify:

  • The potential benefits of developing microgrids, including whether and how developing microgrids improves grid resilience and reliability;
  • The critical facilities and infrastructure and the high-risk communities that should be prioritized for microgrid projects (projects);
  • Existing and potential threats to grid resilience and reliability and how microgrids may help to overcome the threats; and
  • Recommendations regarding potential legislative or administrative changes needed to help facilitate projects, including needed statutory or rule changes, key factors to consider regarding the safety, development, maintenance, and deployment of microgrids, metrics for evaluating the costs and benefits of microgrids, financial and technical support for microgrid deployment, and education and outreach programs , including apprenticeship programs .

The office and department are is required to post a draft of the roadmap on its website on or before July 1, 2024, and the office and department are required to post the completed roadmap on their websites. The office is also required to submit a copy of the roadmap to the public utilities commission (commission), and, on or before March 1, 2025, in collaboration with the department, present the roadmap to the legislative committees of reference with jurisdiction over energy matters. On a periodic basis at least every 5 years, the office, department, and resiliency office are required to review the roadmap and, if necessary, update it. If the roadmap is updated, it must be posted on the office's and department's websites and submitted to the commission and the legislative committees of reference with jurisdiction over energy matters.For the 2022-23 state fiscal year, $22,470 is appropriated from the general fund to the office of the governor for use by the Colorado energy office to develop the roadmap.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/17/2022 Signed by the President of the Senate
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1301 Controlled Environmental Agricultural Facility As Agricultural Property 
Comment:
Position: Amend
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Controlled Environmental Agricultural Facility As Agricultural Property
Sponsors: M. Soper (R) | D. Roberts (D) / K. Donovan (D) | C. Simpson (R)
Summary:

A "controlled environment agricultural facility" (CEA facility) is a nonresidential structure of not less than 1,000 square feet and related equipment and appurtenances that combines engineering, horticultural science, and computer management techniques to optimize hydroponic plant growing hydroponics, plant quality, and food production efficiency from the land's water for human or livestock consumption. The primary sole purpose of growing crops in a CEA facility is to obtain a monetary profit from the wholesale of plant-based food for human or animal livestock consumption.

Commencing January 1, 2023, for property tax purposes:

  • The definition of "agricultural and livestock products" includes crops grown within a CEA facility in a raw or unprocessed state for human or livestock consumption. For purposes of the bill, "agricultural and livestock products" does not include marijuana and hemp, or any other nonfood crop agricultural products.
  • The definition of "agricultural equipment" that is used on the farm or ranch or in a CEA facility includes any personal property used in connection with the operation of a CEA facility for planting, growing, and harvesting crops any personal property within a facility, whether attached to a building or not, that is capable of being removed from the facility, and is used in direct connection with the operation of a CEA facility, which facility is used solely for planting, growing, or harvesting crops in a raw or unprocessed state; and
  • The definition of "agricultural land" includes any land underlying or integral to the operation of a CEA facility;
  • "All other agricultural property" does not include a CEA facility that has been in production for at least 2 years; and
  • Agricultural equipment that is used in any CEA facility is exempt from the levy and collection of property tax.

Under the bill, a CEA facility is valued for assessment purposes based on the net operating income derived from the production and sale of the crops grown within the facility and capitalized at the same rate as irrigated agricultural land. The value so determined must be reduced by 25% to determine the actual value of the CEA facility for property tax purposes as all other agricultural property using the cost, market, and income approaches to value. If the sole use of the CEA facility is not the growing of crops for human or livestock consumption, then the property is classified and valued for assessment purposes based on actual use.If the primary use of the CEA facility is not the growing of crops for human or livestock consumption, then the property is classified and valued for assessment purposes as other agricultural property.As part of the personal declaration the owner of a CEA facility signs and returns to the county assessor, the bill requires the owner to include an affidavit executed by the owner in which the owner affirms that the CEA facility meets the requirements for such a facility as specified in the bill. If the crop grown in the CEA facility is hemp, the owner must also include a copy of a license to verify to the assessor that the crop is not marijuana.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1308 Agricultural Workforce Services Program 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Agricultural Workforce Services Program
Sponsors: K. McCormick (D) / K. Donovan (D)
Summary:

The bill creates the Colorado agricultural workforce services program (program) in the department of agriculture (department) and requires the department to create and maintain an online resource portal for agricultural employees and employers.

The bill also creates the Colorado agricultural workplace improvement grant program (grant program) and requires the department to administer the grant program and, subject to available appropriations, award grants. The department may determine minimum eligibility requirements for grant recipients; however, the department may award grants only:

  • To Colorado agricultural employers;
  • To entities that provide services to Colorado agricultural employers or agricultural employees; and
  • For the purpose of facilitating labor law compliance, improving workplaces, and providing education to agricultural employees to help them understand their legal rights.

On or before January 1, 2023, and on or before January 1 each year thereafter, the department shall submit to the agriculture, livestock, and water committee of the house of representatives and the agriculture and natural resources committee of the senate a report concerning the operations of the program, including the grant program.

For the 2022-23 state fiscal year, the general assembly must appropriate $500,000 $215,000 from the general fund to the department to implement the program, including the grant program online resource portal . Any unused money does not revert to the general fund but is continuously appropriated to the department.

The grant program is repealed, effective January 1, 2026.

For the 2022-23 state fiscal year, the bill appropriates:

  • $215,000 from the general fund to the department, with $29,086 for use by the commissioner's office and administrative services for personal services and $185,914 for use by the agricultural markets division for the program; and
  • $42,859 from the general fund to the department of labor and employment for use by the division of labor standards and statistics.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1313 Agricultural Housing Public Health COVID-19 Emergency 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Agricultural Housing Public Health COVID-19 Emergency
Sponsors: K. McCormick (D) | Y. Caraveo (D) / D. Moreno (D)
Summary:

Current law specifies housing requirements for agricultural workers with which agricultural employers must comply during a public health emergency. The bill clarifies that these requirements apply only during a statewide public health emergency that concerns COVID-19. The bill allows an alternative to compliance with the existing housing requirements by authorizing a person engaged in agricultural employment to instead comply with alternative protections identified in a public health order issued by the department of public health and environment.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/26/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1316 Colorado Water Conservation Board Construction Fund Project 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Colorado Water Conservation Board Construction Fund Project
Sponsors: K. McCormick (D) | M. Catlin (R) / K. Donovan (D) | C. Simpson (R)
Summary:

The bill appropriates the following amounts from the Colorado water conservation board (CWCB) construction fund to the CWCB or the division of water resources in the department of natural resources for the following projects:

  • Continuation of the satellite monitoring system, $380,000 ( section 1 );
  • Continuation of the Colorado floodplain map modernization program, $500,000 ( section 2 );
  • Continuation of the weather modification permitting program, $350,000 ( section 3 );
  • Continuation of technical assistance for federal cost-share programs, $300,000 ( section 4 );
  • Continuation of the Arkansas river decision support system, $500,000 ( section 6 );
  • Continuation of the Colorado Mesonet project, $150,000 ( section 7 );
  • Continuation of the water forecasting partnership project, $450,000 ( section 8 );
  • Support of modeling and data analyses for the upper Colorado river commission's interstate planning and negotiation efforts, $200,000 ( section 9 );
  • Performance of comprehensive dam safety evaluations for the reservoir enlargement assessment project, $250,000 ( section 11 );
  • Support of the Platte river recovery implementation program, $3,800,000 ( section 12 ); and
  • Support of Republican river matters related to meeting compact compliance obligations, $2,000,000 ( section 13 ).

The bill appropriates $8,200,000 from the water plan implementation cash fund to the CWCB for grant-making for projects that assist in implementing the state water plan ( section 15 ).

The bill directs the state treasurer to transfer the following amounts on July 1, 2022:

  • Up to $2,000,000 from the CWCB construction fund to the litigation fund ( section 5 ); and
  • $1,000,000 from the CWCB construction fund to the water plan implementation cash fund ( section 10 ).

Section 14 authorizes the CWCB to make loans of up to $13,130,000 from the CWCB construction fund to the town of Breckenridge to rehabilitate the Goose Pasture Tarn dam.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/2/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1322 Water Quality Regulation 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(3) in senate calendar.
News:
Short Title: Water Quality Regulation
Sponsors: A. Benavidez (D) | A. Valdez (D) / D. Moreno (D) | J. Gonzales (D)
Summary:

The bill:

  • Requires the water quality control commission (commission) to conduct outreach and gather input from disproportionately impacted communities regarding the commission's rule-making proceedings, licensing proceedings, and adjudicatory hearings ( section 1 of the bill);
  • Requires the commission to utilize the criteria promulgated by rule by the commission in designating waters as use-protected ( section 2 ); and
  • Creates a 5-year statute of limitations for bringing actions alleging violations of the "Colorado Water Quality Control Act" (act) or any rules or orders under the act ( section 3 ).
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/11/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1334 Food Distribution Program Administrative Fee 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Food Distribution Program Administrative Fee
Sponsors: L. Herod (D) / R. Zenzinger (D)
Summary:

Joint Budget Committee. Under current law, the department of human services (state department) may charge an administrative fee to an agency that receives commodities through a food distribution program on a monthly basis. The bill changes this to allow the state department to collect an administrative fee at least once every calendar year or when an agency's account balance reaches $100 or more.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/20/2022 Sent to the Governor
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1355 Producer Responsibility Program For Recycling 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(5) in senate calendar.
News: Colorado’s legislature powers through harried final days toward the end of 2022 lawmaking term Wednesday
With less than 36 hours left in legislative session, more than 100 bills pending
Short Title: Producer Responsibility Program For Recycling
Sponsors: L. Cutter (D) / K. Priola (R) | J. Gonzales (D)
Summary:

On or before June 1, 2023, the executive director (executive director) of the Colorado department of public health and environment (department) must designate a nonprofit organization (organization) to implement and manage a statewide program (program) that provides recycling services to covered entities in the state, which are defined as residences, businesses, schools, hospitality locations, government buildings, and public places. The program is funded by annual dues (producer responsibility dues) paid by producers of products that use covered materials (producers). Covered materials are defined as packaging materials and paper products that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state .

The bill creates the producer responsibility program for statewide recycling advisory board (advisory board) that consists of members who have expertise in recycling programs and are knowledgeable about recycling services in the different geographic regions of the state.

Prior to the implementation of the program, the organization must:

  • On or before September 1, 2023, hire an independent third party to conduct an assessment of the recycling services currently provided in the state and the recycling needs in the state that are not being met (needs assessment);
  • On or before April 1, 2024, report the results of the needs assessment to the advisory board and the executive director; and
  • On or before February 1, 2025, after soliciting input from the advisory board and other key stakeholders, submit a plan proposal for the program (plan proposal) to the advisory board and executive director.

The plan proposal will initially cover recycling services only for residential covered entities. The plan proposal must:

  • Describe how the organization will meet certain convenience standards and statewide recycling, collection, and postconsumer-recycled-content rates (rates);
  • Establish a funding mechanism through the collection of producer responsibility dues that covers the organization's costs in implementing the program and the costs of the department in overseeing the program;
  • Establish an objective formula to reimburse 100% of the net recycling services costs of public and private recycling service providers (providers) performing services under the program;
  • Provide a list of covered materials (minimum recyclable list) that providers performing services under the program must collect to be eligible for reimbursement under the program;
  • Set minimum rate targets that the state will strive to meet by January 1, 2030, and January 1, 2035, and describe how the state can meet increased rates after 2035; and
  • Describe a process and timeline, beginning no later than 2028, to expand recycling services to applicable nonresidential covered entities.

As part of the program, the organization must:

  • Utilize and expand on providers' existing recycling services to provide statewide recycling services at no charge to covered entities for all covered materials on the minimum recyclable list;
  • Develop and implement a statewide education and outreach program on the recycling and reuse of covered materials;
  • Contract with an independent third party to conduct an annual audit of the program; and
  • Submit an annual report to the advisory board and the executive director describing the progress of the program (annual report).

On January 1, 2025, and each January 1 thereafter, as an alternative to participating in the program, a producer may submit an individual plan proposal to the advisory board. The advisory board will review and make recommendations on, and the executive director shall approve or reject, the individual plan proposal.The bill establishes the producer responsibility program for statewide recycling administration fund (fund). On or before June 30, 2026, and on each June 30 thereafter, the department will notify the organization of its costs in overseeing and enforcing the program, and the organization will transmit a portion of the producer responsibility dues to the fund for the purposes of reimbursing the department for its costs.

Effective July 1, 2025, a producer may not sell or distribute any products that use covered materials in the state unless the producer is participating in the program or, after January 1, 2029, as set forth in an additional producer responsibility program that has been approved by the executive director the final plan or another plan approved by the executive director .

The advisory board has the following duties:

  • Advise the organization on the needs assessment;
  • Review the needs assessment;
  • Review the plan proposal and make recommendations to the executive director regarding its approval or rejection;
  • Review any necessary amendments to the program, make recommendations on the amendments to the organization, and then make recommendations to the executive director regarding approval or rejection of the amendments;
  • Review the annual report submitted by the organization; and
  • Consult with the organization on the development and updating of the minimum recyclable list.

The bill establishes an administrative penalty for the organization's or a producer's violation of the relevant statutes and rules. The collected penalties are deposited into the recycling resources economic opportunity fund.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/11/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1361 Oil And Gas Reporting 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Oil And Gas Reporting
Sponsors: A. Boesenecker (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | T. Story (D)
Summary:

The bill requires:

  • No later than January 1, 2023, the oil and gas conservation commission (commission) to promulgate rules to require an oil and gas operator to conduct meter certification and calibration on an annual basis and submit an annual report to the commission that describes the results of that meter certification and calibration;
  • No later than February 1, 2025, the state auditor to select a random sample of operators (random sample) and provide the list of operators in the random sample to the commission oil and gas conservation commission (commission), the executive director of the department of revenue (executive director), and the division of administration in the department of public health and environment (division);
  • No later than April 15, 2025, the commission, executive director, and division to submit certain reporting information for the operators in the random sample for calendar year 2023 and other information to the state auditor;
  • No later than May 1, 2025, the state auditor to commence conducting or cause to be conducted a performance audit based on the information submitted by the commission, the executive director, and the division; and
  • No later than March 1, 2026, the state auditor to prepare a report and recommendations based on the performance audit, which the state auditor will present to the legislative audit committee.

The bill also establishes a maximum penalty of $1,000 per day per violation for oil and gas operators in relation to violations related to the filing of air pollution emission notices with the division.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1364 Food Pantry Assistance Grant Program 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Food Pantry Assistance Grant Program
Sponsors: L. Cutter (D) | M. Soper (R) / T. Story (D) | K. Priola (R)
Summary:

The food pantry assistance grant program is set to repeal on June 30, 2023. The bill extends the food pantry assistance grant program through July 1, 2028.

For the 2022-23 state fiscal year, the bill appropriates $5 million from the general fund. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the bill appropriates $3.5 million from the general fund. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year through the 2026-27 state fiscal year, the bill appropriates $2 million annually from the general fund to be used only for the purchase of Colorado agricultural products; agricultural products that hold cultural significance for indigenous first nations people, or for other cultures or subcultural groups, including the ways in which those agricultural products are produced; agricultural products sold by agricultural producers located within 400 miles of the grant recipient; agricultural products sold by indigenous first nations producers located within Colorado and in neighboring states; and technical assistance.

The bill allows up to $100,000 annually of the appropriation to be used to hire a nonprofit entity to provide technical assistance to a grant recipient to train food pantries and assist in the location and purchase of Colorado agricultural products. The bill also allows a grant recipient to pre-purchase Colorado agricultural products.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1380 Critical Services For Low-income Households 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(5) in house calendar.
News:
Short Title: Critical Services For Low-income Households
Sponsors: S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) | R. Pelton (R) / J. Bridges (D) | D. Coram (R)
Summary:

The bill requires the department of human services to implement a work management system across all counties to interface with the Colorado benefits management system used to process and approve applications for essential state public assistance programs such as the supplemental nutrition assistance program (SNAP), medicaid, and Colorado works.

The bill integrates eligibility and enrollment for SNAP with eligibility criteria for the Colorado low-income energy assistance program to increase access.

The bill creates a community food access program (food program) in the department of agriculture (department). The purpose of the food program is to improve access to and lower prices for healthy foods in low-income and underserved areas of the state by supporting small grocery retailers. The small food business recovery and resilience grant program (grant program) is established, to be overseen by the food program. An advisory committee is established to assist the department with the grant program. One-time grants not to exceed $25,000 will be provided to small grocery retailers to help support infrastructure and other necessary items to make fresh, healthy food more accessible to low-income and underserved communities. The department is granted authority to promulgate rules as necessary to implement the food program.

The food program is repealed, effective September 1, 2027.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/11/2022 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


HB22-1414 Healthy Meals For All Public School Students 
Comment:
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Healthy Meals For All Public School Students
Sponsors: S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) / B. Pettersen (D) | R. Fields (D)
Summary:

The bill creates the healthy school meals for all program (program) in the department of education (department) to:

  • Reimburse school food authorities that choose to participate in the program (participating school food authorities) for free meals provided to students who are not eligible for free or reduced-price meals under the federal school meals programs;
  • Provide local food purchasing grants to eligible participating school food authorities;
  • Provide funding to participating school food authorities to increase the wages or provide stipends for individuals employed to prepare and serve food; and
  • Provide assistance to participating school food authorities through the local school food purchasing technical assistance and education grant program.

The portion of the program that provides reimbursement for school meals begins operating in the 2023-24 budget year. The remaining portions of the program begin operating in the first full budget year after the state of Colorado begins participating in the federal demonstration project to use medicaid eligibility to identify students who are eligible for the federal school meals programs (demonstration project).

A participating school food authority must:

  • Provide free meals to all students enrolled in the public schools that the participating school food authority serves and that participate in the national school lunch program or national school breakfast program;
  • Provide to the department annual notice of participation; and
  • Maximize the amount of federal reimbursement by participating in the federal community eligibility provision to identify students who are eligible for the federal school meals programs.

The amount of reimbursement distributed pursuant to the program is equal to the federal free reimbursement rate multiplied by the total number of meals served minus any other federal or state reimbursement the school food authority receives for providing meals.

The bill requires the department to:

  • Participate in the federal community eligibility provision for the state as a whole, if that option is available; and
  • Apply to participate in the demonstration project.

Under the bill, a participating school food authority that creates a parent and student committee to advise on food purchasing (advisory committee) is eligible to receive a local food purchasing grant (grant) to purchase Colorado grown, raised, or processed products for school meals. Each eligible participating school food authority must comply with reporting requirements. The bill establishes the amount of the grants, limits on how the grant money may be spent, and the required membership of the advisory committee. The department must annually review a sample of the invoices for purchases made using grant money to ensure compliance with purchasing requirements.

The bill creates the local school food purchasing technical assistance and education grant program (grant program) under which a statewide nonprofit organization distributes grants to promote the purchase of Colorado grown, raised, or processed products by participating school food authorities and to assist participating school food authorities in preparing meals using basic ingredients rather than processed products. The nonprofit organization must report annually to the department concerning implementation of the grant program.

The department must submit to committees of the general assembly a biennial report concerning implementation of the program. The department must contract with an independent auditor to conduct a biennial financial and performance audit of the program. The report and the audit must include implementation of the program, implementation of the local food purchasing grants, use of the additional amount for increasing wages or providing stipends, and implementation of the grant program.

The bill directs the general assembly to appropriate annually, by line item in the annual appropriation bill, the amount necessary to implement the program, including a specified amount for the grant program.

Current law caps state income tax itemized deductions for taxpayers who have federal adjusted gross income of $400,000 or more at $30,000 for single filers and $60,000 for joint filers. The bill applies the cap to both itemized and standard income tax deductions for taxpayers who have federal adjusted gross income of $300,000 or more and lowers the cap to $12,000 for single filers and $16,000 for joint filers. The amount of revenue generated by the changes to the cap must be appropriated to fund the program. If the program is repealed, the changes to the cap no longer apply.

The bill takes effect only if it is approved by the voters at the November 2022 general election. This approval is a voter-approved revenue change that allows the state to retain and spend all revenue generated by the changes to the cap on state income tax deductions.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-013 Boards And Commissions 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Boards And Commissions
Sponsors: S. Fenberg (D) | C. Holbert (R) / A. Garnett (D) | H. McKean (R)
Summary:

The bill makes changes related to the requirements for various boards and commissions (boards).

Section 1 of the bill includes standard provisions that generally apply to boards for which membership is based in full or in part on representation from the congressional districts of the state. Specifically, unless a statute or constitutional provision creating a board provides otherwise:

  • If a member appointed to represent a district no longer resides in the district due solely to a change in the district's boundaries following redistricting, the member may serve the remainder of their term notwithstanding the nonresidency;
  • If a board increases in size due to the addition of a new congressional district in the state, the appointing authority shall appoint a new member to represent the new district as soon as practicable; and
  • If a board decreases in size due to the loss of a congressional district in the state, the appointing authority shall determine which current member's term should be terminated, or, if the member will be replaced by an at-large or other member, which member should be replaced at the expiration of the member's term. The appointing authority must attempt to ensure that the remaining membership adequately represents the remaining congressional districts.

Section 2 establishes standard provisions that apply to all boards unless the statute or constitutional provision creating a board provides differently. The standard provisions include: requiring an appointing authority to fill a vacancy for the remainder of the unexpired term, allowing the designee of a state official to fulfill the official's duties on the board, defining the term "minimum majority" to mean the lowest number of members that is more than half, allowing members to participate in meetings of the board remotely, and clarifying how partial terms count towards any applicable term limit.Sections 33 and 40 update the statutes that establish the membership of the state board of education and the board of regents of the university of Colorado, respectively, both of which are elected boards created in the state constitution. For the state board of education, section 33 provides for the election of one new member to represent the eighth congressional district and one new member from the state at large at the 2022 general election. For the board of regents, section 40 requires the election of a member to represent the eighth congressional district in place of the election of a member representing the state at large at the 2022 general election.Sections 37, 42, 52, 60, 73, 85, 86, 90, 101, and 107 amend statutes governing boards for which membership is based on the number of congressional districts in the state. For each board, the total number of members is no longer specified. Instead, each statute provides for the appointment of members from each congressional district in the state plus, as applicable, additional members as is currently provided for each board. Provisions requiring staggering of terms and limits on the number of board members who may be affiliated with a single political party are amended to refer to a "minimum majority" of the board to accommodate any future changes in board membership resulting from changes in the number of Colorado congressional districts.Section 133 repeals a statute that addressed the impact of redistricting on boards following the 2000 federal decennial census, and a statute that adjusted the lengths of terms of members of certain boards in 1987.

The remaining sections of the bill make changes to statutory provisions governing various boards with appointed members, including:

  • Repealing deadlines for events or actions that have already occurred;
  • Repealing language setting specific expiration dates or requirements for board members' terms in order to create staggering of the board members' terms, and replacing it with a general requirement that the terms of office are staggered;
  • Repealing requirements for notice and hearing before a board member can be removed for cause by an appointing authority;
  • Repealing, for certain boards, the requirement that a board member serve until the board member's successor is confirmed by the senate;
  • Updating archaic language to conform to current drafting standards;
  • Reorganizing sections to clarify requirements related to appointments, qualifications for appointees, and terms of office;
  • Clarifying requirements related to the number of board members that may be affiliated with one political party; and
  • Making conforming amendments.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 2/25/2022 Governor Signed
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-017 Fluid Milk Products Not Divisible Load 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Fluid Milk Products Not Divisible Load
Sponsors: R. Scott (R) | R. Zenzinger (D) / A. Boesenecker (D) | M. Catlin (R)
Summary:

Transportation Legislation Review Committee. Current law has weight limits for vehicles. One of the factors that determines a vehicle's weight limit is whether a load is divisible, which means that the load can be divided up to lower its weight. The bill deems that a load of fluid milk products carried by a vehicle is not a divisible load.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/3/2022 Governor Signed
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-028 Groundwater Compact Compliance Fund 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Groundwater Compact Compliance Fund
Sponsors: C. Simpson (R) | J. Sonnenberg (R) / D. Roberts (D) | M. Catlin (R)
Summary:

Water Resources Review Committee. The bill creates the groundwater compact compliance and sustainability fund to help finance groundwater use reduction efforts in the Rio Grande river basin and the Republican river basin, such as efforts to buy and retire irrigation wells and irrigated acreage in the river basins. The Colorado water conservation board administers the fund and can make expenditures from the fund based on recommendations from the board of directors of the Rio Grande water conservation district or the Republican river water conservation district. A conservation district's recommendations must first be approved by the state engineer.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/16/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-029 Investment Water Speculation 
Comment:
Position: Oppose
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Investment Water Speculation
Sponsors: D. Coram (R) | K. Donovan (D) / K. McCormick (D)
Summary:

Water Resources Review Committee. Section 1 of the bill prohibits a purchaser of agricultural water rights that are represented by shares in a mutual ditch company from engaging in investment water speculation. Investment water speculation is the purchase of agricultural water rights that are represented by shares in a mutual ditch company in the state with the intent, at the time of purchase, to profit from an increase in the water's value in a subsequent transaction or by receiving payment from another person for nonuse of all or a portion of the water subject to the water right.

On or after January 1, 2023, the state engineer or the state engineer's designee (state engineer) may investigate complaints of investment water speculation. If a purchaser holds, or by virtue of a proposed sale or transfer, will hold at least a minimum percent of the shares in a mutual ditch company, about which minimum percent the mutual ditch company must determine and notify the state engineer on or before December 31, 2022, there is a rebuttable presumption that the purchaser is engaged in investment water speculation. The state engineer may fine a purchaser up to $10,000 for a violation and require, for a period of up to 2 years after a fine has been imposed, that any sale or transfer of shares in a mutual ditch company to the purchaser be subject to approval by the state engineer.

If the state engineer believes that a complaint is frivolous or was filed for the purpose of harassing a seller or purchaser, the state engineer may refer the matter to the attorney general's office for the attorney general or the attorney general's designee (attorney general) to investigate and, if the attorney general determines that enforcement is warranted, bring a civil action in a court of competent jurisdiction alleging the complaint is frivolous or was filed for the purpose of harassment. If the attorney general prevails in the civil action, the court may fine a complainant up to $1,000, prohibit the complainant from filing any complaints alleging investment water speculation for up to one year, and grant attorney fees and court costs. Section 3 authorizes the attorney general to bring a civil action against a complainant if the state engineer refers the matter to the attorney general.Section 2 requires the board of directors of a mutual ditch company to determine the minimum percent of agricultural water rights held by all of the shareholders in the mutual ditch company that a purchaser holds or, by virtue of the sale or transfer of shares in the mutual ditch company, will hold that creates a rebuttable presumption that the purchaser is engaging in investment water speculation.
(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 4/21/2022 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Lay Over Amended
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-030 Expand Water Resources Review Committe To Include Agriculture 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Expand Water Resources Review Committe To Include Agriculture
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) | J. Sonnenberg (R) / B. McLachlan (D) | M. Catlin (R)
Summary:

Water Resources Review Committee. The bill changes the name of the water resources review committee to the water resources and agriculture review committee (committee) and expands the scope of the committee to include agriculture issues.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/30/2022 Governor Signed
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-042 Colorado State Fair Authority Board Membership 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Colorado State Fair Authority Board Membership
Sponsors: D. Coram (R) / D. Esgar (D) | P. Will (R)
Summary:

The bill restructures the board of commissioners of the Colorado state fair authority. Under current law, the appointed members of the board include 2 residents of the county in which the Colorado state fair and industrial exposition is held, one resident of each of the 7 congressional districts, and one person from the state at large. Under the bill, the board still includes 2 residents of the county in which the Colorado state fair and industrial exposition is held, but the remaining 8 appointed members include 2 members from the state at large, and 2 residents from each of the 4 agricultural districts of the state. The terms of office of the 8 appointed members currently representing the congressional districts and the state at large are terminated on October 31, 2022. The governor is required to appoint 8 new members for terms beginning on November 1, 2022, representing the 4 agricultural districts of the state. The terms of the new members are staggered so that no more than 3 members' terms expire in one year. After the initial staggering, The governor is required to appoint the 2 members from the state at large on October 31, 2022. The members of the board appointed before the effective date of the bill to represent congressional districts may continue to hold office until the expiration of their term, at which point the governor is required to appoint a new member in accordance with the requirements of the bill. Members are appointed for terms of 4 years; except that terms are staggered so that no more than 3 members' terms expire in the same year . To the extent possible, the governor is required to reappoint existing members to represent the agricultural districts in which the existing members reside.One member appointed from each agricultural district must be involved in agricultural production. Of the 10 12 appointed members, at least 2 must reside west of the continental divide, with one of the 2 residing north of interstate 70 and the other residing south of interstate 70. One member must reside east of both U.S. highway 287 and U.S. highway 87. In addition, at least 3 members must be affiliated with each of the major political parties for at least one year prior to appointment, and at least 3 members must be unaffiliated for at least one year prior to appointment. In addition, 4 members must be involved in the agricultural industry. The governor is required to attempt to ensure that the board represents the geographical diversity of the state.

If a person appointed on a temporary basis while the general assembly is not in session is not confirmed by the senate during the next regular session, the person's term ends and the person is not eligible for reappointment as a temporary appointee during the next legislative interim .

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/24/2022 Governor Signed
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-097 Whistleblower Protection Health & Safety 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Whistleblower Protection Health & Safety
Sponsors: B. Pettersen (D) | R. Rodriguez (D) / L. Herod (D) | T. Sullivan (D)
Summary:

Current law provides whistleblower protections for workers who raise a reasonable concern about health or safety related to a public health emergency. The bill expands the protection to all health and safety concerns regardless of whether there is a declared public health emergency.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/9/2022 Sent to the Governor
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-104 Tribal Governments Included In State Programs 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Tribal Governments Included In State Programs
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) | C. Simpson (R) / B. McLachlan (D) | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D)
Summary:

The bill requires new and amended state statutes that enumerate or define local government entities or agencies that are eligible for state grant or benefit programs to include tribal governments or agencies also designate tribal nations with jurisdiction in Colorado as eligible recipients if possible. The legislative council staff is required to submit a report to the legislative council by December 1, 2022, identifying state grant programs in statute and whether those programs include tribal governments as eligible recipients.

The office of the Colorado commission on Indian affairs is required, in consultation with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe, to submit a report to the legislative council identifying opportunities for tribal governments to be included in the operations or programs of the state as a partner, assessing whether the Colorado commission on Indian affairs can facilitate or provide those opportunities, and recommending other ways for the state to facilitate or provide those opportunities.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 Sent to the Governor
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-110 Equip Wind Turbine Aircraft Detection Lighting System 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
CONSIDERATION OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORTS
(1) in senate calendar.
Wednesday, May 11 2022
CONSIDERATION OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT(S)
(1) in house calendar.
News:
Short Title: Equip Wind Turbine Aircraft Detection Lighting System
Sponsors: J. Sonnenberg (R) | C. Kolker (D) / R. Pelton (R)
Summary:

The bill requires that , on or before September 1, 2024, an owner or operator of a new wind-powered energy generation facility (facility), for which vertical construction of the first wind turbine included in the facility begins on or after April 1, 2022, and that is required to obtain a land-use permit from a local government, equip install light mitigating technology (technology) at the facility. with an aircraft detection lighting system (system). The bill defines a system technology as a sensor-based system that is designed to detect approaching aircraft , that keeps the lights off when it is safe to do so, and that meets federal aviation administration (FAA) requirements. An owner or operator of a facility is solely responsible for the costs of installing, operating, or maintaining a system obtaining FAA approval for the installation of approved technology and may request from the governing body of the local government an extension of time up to one year to equip a facility with a system. twenty-four months if the owner or operator can demonstrate that, despite its commercially reasonable efforts, the technology was not available within the time frame afforded. A local government may revoke an existing land-use permit or, if an application for permit renewal is pending, refuse to renew a land-use permit if a facility owner or operator fails to comply with the bill. The board of county commissioners in the county in which a facility is located may adopt and enforce an ordinance or resolution to authorize the board to impose civil penalties of $1,000 per day against a facility owner or operator if the board determines that the owner or operator has failed to comply with the bill.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/18/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-114 Fire Suppression Ponds Water Rights 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Fire Suppression Ponds Water Rights
Sponsors: D. Hisey (R) | T. Story (D) / D. Roberts (D) | M. Catlin (R)
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill makes legislative findings and declarations. Section 2 allows a board of county commissioners (board), in consultation with its fire protection district, to apply to the state engineer for the designation of a pond as a fire suppression pond. The director of the division of fire prevention and control (director) in the department of public safety is required to promulgate rules to establish criteria for boards, in consultation with fire protection districts, to use to identify and evaluate potential fire suppression ponds.Before applying for the designation of a pond as a fire suppression pond, a board, in consultation with its fire protection district, must identify ponds in areas where the outbreak of a fire could result in a major wildfire disaster and perform a needs assessment of each such pond. If a pond that is under consideration for designation as a fire suppression pond is located in whole or in part upon private property, a board must acquire the voluntary written approval of each owner of private property that abuts the pond before the board applies to the state engineer for the designation of the pond as a fire suppression pond. For each pond that is identified and under consideration as a potential fire suppression pond, a board must provide notice of such fact to the state engineer. and to interested parties included in the substitute water supply plan notification list established for the water division in which the pond is located.Section 2 also prohibits the state engineer from draining any pond: ordering any pond to be drained or backfilled:

  • While the pond is under consideration for designation as a fire suppression pond;
  • If the state engineer has designated the pond as a fire suppression pond; or
  • On and after the effective date of the bill, and until the date upon which the director promulgates rules, with exceptions.

Section 2 also states that a fire suppression pond and the water associated with it:

  • Are not considered a water right;
  • Do not have a priority for the purpose of determining water rights; and
  • May not be adjudicated as a water right.

Section 3 requires the state engineer to review applications received from boards and, at the state engineer's discretion, designate ponds as fire suppression ponds. An application is presumed to be approved if the state engineer does not respond to the application within 63 days after the application is received by the state engineer. The state engineer may not designate any pond as a fire suppression pond unless the pond existed as of January 1, 1975. satisfies certain requirements.Section 3 also allows the state engineer to impose reasonable requirements on a board as a condition of designating a pond as a fire suppression pond and requires a board and a fire protection district to inspect a fire suppression pond at least annually.

The designation of a pond as a fire suppression pond expires 20 15 years after the date of the designation. Before the expiration, the board and the fire protection district must may perform a needs assessment of the pond. If the needs assessment demonstrates that the pond is in compliance with criteria established in the director's rules, the board and fire protection district shall notify the state engineer of such fact, and the state engineer shall redesignate the pond as a fire suppression pond. If the needs assessment demonstrates that the pond is not in compliance with the criteria, the board and fire protection district may must either:

  • Notify the state engineer that the designation of the pond as a fire suppression pond should be rescinded or allowed to expire; or
  • Provide to the state engineer a plan and a timeline for bringing the pond back into compliance with such criteria.

Section 3 also provides that the state engineer shall not designate more than 30 total surface acres of pond in any county as a fire suppression pond or designate any pond as a fire suppression pond unless:

  • The pond existed with the same or greater surface area as of June 1, 1972;
  • Decreed storage rights for the pond are limited to use within the pond and only livestock watering, wildlife, or other nonconsumptive uses;
  • The pond is not included as a structure in a decreed plan for augmentation, an appropriative right of exchange, or a state-approved substitute water supply plan;
  • The surface area of the pond does not exceed 6 acres; and
  • The board that requested the designation has provided notice of the request to interested parties included in the substitute water supply plan notification list established for the water division in which the pond is located.

Within 70 days after the state engineer designates a pond as a fire suppression pond, a holder of a decreed water right may file with the water clerk of the water division in which the fire suppression pond is located a petition for review of the state engineer's decision. Upon receiving a petition, a water judge must conduct a review of the state engineer's decision. A water judge may nullify the state engineer's designation of a pond as a fire suppression pond if, after considering the entire record, including any evidence of material injury, the judge finds that:

  • In applying for such designation, the board did not describe a pond that complies with criteria established by rules promulgated by the director; or
  • The state engineer's decision did not accord with certain other requirements in the bill concerning fire suppression ponds.

Section 4 states that the designation of fire suppression ponds by the state engineer does a proposed fire suppression pond is presumed to not cause material injury to vested water rights. A holder of a decreed water right may rebut the presumption by providing evidence to the state engineer sufficient to show that material injury has occurred or will occur to the decreed water right.Section 5 appropriates, for the 2022-23 state fiscal year, $19,428 from the general fund to the department of natural resources for use by the executive director's office, to be used as follows:

  • $11,828 for the purchase of legal services; and
  • $7,600 for the purchase of information technology services.

Section 5 also appropriates, for the 2022-23 state fiscal year, $11,828 to the department of law, to be used to provide legal services for the department of natural resources. This appropriation is from reappropriated funds received from the department of natural resources. Section 5 also appropriates, for the 2022-23 state fiscal year, $7,600 to the office of the governor for use by the office of information technology to provide information technology services for the department of natural resources. This appropriation is from reappropriated funds received from the department of natural resources.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-115 Clarifying Terms Related To Landowner Liability 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Clarifying Terms Related To Landowner Liability
Sponsors: S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | B. Gardner (R) / M. Soper (R) | K. Tipper (D)
Summary:

The bill clarifies the meaning of terms related to landowner liability and declares that the Colorado court of appeals and supreme court decisions in Rocky Mountain Planned Parenthood, Inc. v. Wagner should not be relied upon to the extent that those decisions determined:

  • The foreseeability of third-party criminal conduct based upon whether the goods or services offered by a landowner are controversial; and
  • That a landowner could be held liable as a substantial factor in causing harm without considering whether a third-party criminal act was the predominant cause of that harm.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/7/2022 Governor Signed
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-138 Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions In Colorado 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
SPECIAL ORDERS - SECOND READING OF BILLS
(1) in house calendar.
News:
Short Title: Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions In Colorado
Sponsors: C. Hansen (D) | K. Priola (R) / A. Valdez (D) | K. McCormick (D)
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill requires that, beginning in 2023, each insurance company issued a certificate of authority to transact insurance business to prepare and file an annual report with the insurance commissioner providing a climate-risk assessment for the insurance company's investment portfolio from the previous 12 months. The commissioner of insurance is required to post the reports on the division of insurance's website. Section 1 defines "climate-risk assessment" as a determination of the economic and business risks that climate change poses to an investment that reports more than $100 million on its annual schedule T filing with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) participate in and complete the NAIC's "Insurer Climate Risk Disclosure Survey" or successor survey or reporting mechanism.Section 2 requires the board of trustees of the public employees' retirement association (PERA board ) to prepare a similar include as part of its annual investment stewardship report, and post it which report is posted on the PERA board's website , a description of climate-related investment risks, impacts, and strategies .Section 3 adds wastewater thermal energy equipment to the definition of "pollution control equipment", which equipment may be certified by the division of administration (division) in the department of public health and environment (CDPHE). Similarly, section 13 adds wastewater thermal energy to the definition of "clean heat resource", which resources a gas distribution utility includes in its clean heat plan filed with the public utilities commission.Section 3 4 updates the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction goals to add a 40% 65% reduction goal for 2028 2035 compared to 2005 GHG pollution levels and a 75% reduction goal for 2040 compared to 2005 GHG pollution levels.Section 4 defines a small off-road engine as a gasoline-powered engine of 50 horsepower or less used to fuel small off-road equipment like lawn mowers and leaf blowers. Section 4 phases out the use of small off-road engines by prohibiting their sale in nonattainment areas of the state on or after January 1, 2030, and by providing financial incentives to promote the replacement of small off-road engines with electric-powered, small off-road equipment before 2030.Section 11 establishes a state income tax credit in an amount equal to 30% of the purchase price for new, electric-powered, small off-road equipment for purchases made in income tax years 2023 through 2029. Section 5 requires the air quality control commission (AQCC), on or before August 1, 2023, to adopt rules to reduce GHG emissions, at a minimum, from sources in the industrial and manufacturing sector that reported GHG emissions greater than 25,000 metric tons from 2020 pursuant to the AQCC rule commonly known as "regulation number 22".Section 6 7 gives the oil and gas conservation commission (COGCC) authority over class VI injection wells used for sequestration of GHG including through the issuance and enforcement of permits if the governor and COGCC have determined that the state has sufficient resources to ensure the safe and effective regulation of the sequestration of GHG gases in accordance with a study that the COGCC conducts . If the governor and COGCC determine there are sufficient resources, the COGCC may seek primacy under the federal "Safe Drinking Water Act" and, once granted, may issue and enforce permits for class VI injection wells. The COGCC shall require, as part of its regulation of class VI injection wells, that operators of the wells provide adequate financial assurance, which financial assurance must be maintained until the COGCC approves the closure of a class VI injection well site.Section 7 8 requires the commissioner of agriculture or the commissioner's designee, in consultation with the Colorado energy office , and the air quality control commission the AQCC, and an institution of higher education with expertise in climate change mitigation, adaptation benefits, and other environmental benefits related to agricultural research , to conduct a study examining carbon reduction and sequestration opportunities in the agricultural sector and in land management in the state, including the potential development of certified carbon offset programs or credit instruments. On or before December 15, 2022 October 1, 2024 , the commissioner of agriculture or the commissioner's designee is required to submit a report summarizing the study, including any legislative recommendations, to the general assembly. The commissioner of agriculture may adopt rules incorporating recommendations and any recommended carbon offsets may be incorporated into the AQCC's rules.

In support of the use of agrivoltaics, which is the colocation integration of solar energy generation facilities on a parcel of land with agricultural activities, section 8 9 authorizes the Colorado agriculture value-added development board (board) to provide financing, including grants or loans, for agricultural research on the use of agrivoltaics. Section 9 directs the state treasurer to transfer $1,800,000 per year through 2027 from the general fund to the agriculture value-added cash fund for implementation of agrivoltaics research. For a research project for which the board awards money to study the use of agrivoltaics, sections 5 and 8 6 and 9 require the director of the division of parks and wildlife to consult on the research project regarding the wildlife impacts of agrivoltaic use.Section 9 10 authorizes the board to seek, accept, and expend gifts, grants, and donations, including donations of in-kind resources such as solar panels, for use in agricultural research projects. Section 9 10 also updates the statutory definition of "agrivoltaics" to list additional agricultural activities on the parcel of land on with which solar panel generation facilities may be colocated integrated , including animal husbandry, cover cropping for soil health, and carbon sequestration.Section 10 11 amends the statutory definition of "solar energy facility" used in determining the valuation of public utilities for property tax purposes to include agrivoltaics.Section 12 establishes a state income tax credit in an amount equal to 30% of the purchase price for new, electric-powered, small off-road equipment, which is defined as a lawn mower, leaf blower, or trimmer, for purchases made in income tax years 2023 through 2029. The tax credit may be claimed by a seller of electric-powered, small off-road equipment that demonstrates that it provided the purchaser a 30% discount from the purchase price of the electric-powered, small off-road equipment.Section 14 appropriates for state fiscal year 2022-23:

  • $81,429 from the oil and gas conservation and environmental response fund to the department of natural resources for use by the COGCC for the underground injection program;
  • $145,789 from the general fund to CDPHE for use by the division for regulation of stationary sources; and
  • $2,098,784 from the general fund to the department of agriculture for conservation services.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/9/2022 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-151 Safe Crossings For Colorado Wildlife And Motorists 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News: Legislation would lead to wildlife crossings in Colorado
Short Title: Safe Crossings For Colorado Wildlife And Motorists
Sponsors: J. Danielson (D) | T. Story (D) / J. McCluskie (D) | P. Will (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the Colorado wildlife safe passages cash fund (fund) within the state treasury for use by the department of transportation (department) to provide funding for projects by the department that provide safe road crossings for connectivity of wildlife and that reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. The department must consult with the division of parks and wildlife and the Colorado wildlife and transportation alliance regarding the disbursement of money from the fund and must annually report on the disbursement of such money.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/18/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-172 Colorado Rural Health-care Workforce Initiative 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Colorado Rural Health-care Workforce Initiative
Sponsors: F. Winter (D) | B. Rankin (R) / D. Roberts (D) | J. Rich (R)
Summary:

The bill establishes the Colorado rural health-care workforce initiative (initiative) to expand the number of health-care professionals practicing in Colorado's rural or frontier counties. As part of the initiative, an institution of higher education (institution) is authorized to establish and operate a health-care professionals rural track within any health-care professional education program offered by the institution.

A rural track must set aside seats in its health-care professional education program for students who express an interest in studying and working in a rural or frontier county, offer didactic curriculum related to practicing the health-care discipline in rural or frontier counties, place students in rural or frontier counties for hands-on instruction and training, and award scholarships to students in the rural track. In order to receive a scholarship, a student must commit to working as a health-care professional in a rural or frontier county for 2 years after completing education and training.

The rural office at the university of Colorado's school of medicine (rural program office) provides technical assistance to the institutions operating a rural track regarding recruiting and admitting students committed to working in rural areas and identifying rural or frontier counties in which students may be placed for clinical training. The rural program office also facilitates, arranges, or advises an institution about arranging housing for students placed in a rural or frontier county. The rural program office must provide, without charge, to institutions operating a rural track, didactic curriculum related to practicing in rural or frontier counties. The bill requires the rural program office to annually evaluate the effectiveness of the initiative and report to the general assembly's education committees about the initiative.

The bill requires the general assembly to annually appropriate $150,000 to the rural program office to support institutions that operate a rural track. For state fiscal year 2022-23, the general assembly is required to appropriate up to $400,000 to certain institutions to establish or expand rural tracks in 12 programs specified in the bill. The bill requires the department of higher education (department) to enter into limited purpose fee-for-service contract to provide funding for the rural program office to carry out its duties related to the initiative. The department is also required to enter into limited purpose fee-for-service contracts with institution governing boards to operate a rural track in programs specified in the bill. The department is required to allocate money to Colorado mountain college to establish a rural track in its nursing program.

The bill appropriates $1,200,000 to the department from the general fund for fee-for-service contracts and allocations for the initiative.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/16/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-195 Modifications To Conservation District Grant Fund 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Modifications To Conservation District Grant Fund
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) | J. Sonnenberg (R) / M. Catlin (R) | D. Valdez (D)
Summary:

The bill repeals the provision that repeals the conservation district grant fund (fund) on December 31, 2022. The bill also requires that on an annual basis:

  • The state treasurer transfers $148,000 from the general fund to the fund; and
  • The department of agriculture transfers $2,000 from the fund to each conservation district.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-198 Orphaned Oil And Gas Wells Enterprise 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Orphaned Oil And Gas Wells Enterprise
Sponsors: S. Fenberg (D) | R. Scott (R) / M. Weissman (D) | P. Will (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise (enterprise) in the department of natural resources for the purpose of:

  • Plugging, reclaiming, and remediating orphaned wells located in the state for which no owner or operator can be found or for which the owner or operator is unwilling or unable to pay the costs of plugging and abandoning the well;
  • Ensuring that the costs associated with the plugging, reclaiming, and remediating of orphaned wells are borne by operators in the form of mitigation fees;
  • Determining the amounts of mitigation fees; and
  • Imposing and collecting mitigation fees.

On or before August 1, 2022; on or before April 30, 2023; and on or before April 30 each year thereafter, each operator shall pay a mitigation fee to the enterprise for each well that has been spud but is not yet plugged and abandoned, in accordance with rules promulgated by the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission (commission), in the following amounts:

  • For operators with production that is equal to or less than a threshold to be determined by rules of the commission, $125 for each well; or
  • For operators with production that exceeds a threshold to be determined by rules of the commission, $225 for each well.

Money collected as mitigation fees is credited to the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise cash fund (fund), which is created in the bill.

The bill also creates the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise board (enterprise board) and requires the enterprise board to administer the enterprise and, at least annually, to:

  • Consider whether the mitigation fee amounts should be increased or reduced, based on current circumstances and reasonably anticipated future expenditures from the fund;
  • If the enterprise board determines that an increase or reduction of the mitigation fee amounts is warranted, adjust the mitigation fee amounts; and
  • Advise the commission of the outcome of the enterprise board's deliberations.

The commission may promulgate rules as necessary to implement the enterprise.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2022 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-199 Native Pollinating Insects Protection Study 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(18) in house calendar.
News:
Short Title: Native Pollinating Insects Protection Study
Sponsors: S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | K. Priola (R) / C. Kipp (D) | M. Froelich (D)
Summary:

The bill requires the executive director of the department of natural resources or the executive director's designee (executive director) to conduct a study as soon as practicable regarding the challenges associated with native pollinating insect decline populations , their associated ecosystems, and their health and resilience in the state. Based on the results of the study, the executive director is required to make recommendations:

  • For the protection of native pollinating insects; and
  • On best practices for state agencies in implementing policies and practices regarding native pollinating insects; and
  • On how to develop education and outreach programming.

On or before January 1, 2024, the executive director shall submit to the general assembly and the governor a report summarizing the study and the executive director's recommendations based on the study.

The bill appropriates $179,642 in state fiscal year 2022-23 from the general fund to the department of natural resources for implementation of the study.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/18/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-200 Rural Provider Stimulus Grant Program 
Comment:
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Rural Provider Stimulus Grant Program
Sponsors: J. Ginal (D) | B. Rankin (R) / M. Soper (R) | J. McCluskie (D)
Summary:

The bill establishes the rural provider access and affordability stimulus grant program (grant program) in the Colorado department of health care policy and financing (state department). As part of the grant program, the state department may award grants for projects that modernize the affordability solutions and the information technology of health-care providers in rural communities (rural providers) and projects that expand access to health care in rural communities. The types of rural providers eligible for grants under the grant program are rural hospitals that have a lower net patient revenue or fund balance than other rural hospitals in the state, as determined by the medical services board (state board) by rule.

On or before December 31, 2022:

  • The state department must adopt guidelines for the grant program (guidelines); and
  • The state board must adopt rules as necessary for the administration of the grant program (rules).

The bill creates the rural provider access and affordability advisory committee (advisory committee) in the state department. The advisory committee is required to advise the state department on the administration of the grant program, the adoption of the guidelines, and the selection of grant recipients. The advisory committee is also required to advise on the rules.

The bill also creates the rural provider access and affordability fund (fund) in the state treasury. The bill requires the state treasurer to transfer $10,000,000 from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the fund for awarding grants under the grant program and the administration of the grant program.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/16/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-208 Condemned Conservation Easement Property Compensation 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Condemned Conservation Easement Property Compensation
Sponsors: F. Winter (D) | C. Simpson (R) / M. Lynch (R) | D. Roberts (D)
Summary:

The bill specifies that if property encumbered by a conservation easement in gross is condemned through an eminent domain proceeding, just compensation must be determined based on the value of the property as if unencumbered by the conservation easement in gross and must be allocated between the fee owner and the holder of the conservation easement based upon the value of their respective interests in the property.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/18/2022 Sent to the Governor
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-209 Meat Processing Grant And Loan Assistance 
Comment:
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: Wednesday, May 11 2022
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(14) in house calendar.
News:
Short Title: Meat Processing Grant And Loan Assistance
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) | J. Sonnenberg (R) / D. Roberts (D) | R. Pelton (R)
Summary:

The bill instructs the commissioner of agriculture to hire an employee or engage a contractor to provide grant and loan application assistance to small meat processors or people attempting to start a small meat processor business. The grant or loan must be used to start, expand, or support a small meat processor business. The employee or contractor may also assist agricultural producers and agricultural businesses in applying for and obtaining grants.

The grant and loan application assistance program repeals on July 1, 2024.

To implement the bill, $62,885 is appropriated to the department of agriculture for use by the agricultural markets division.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/11/2022 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Status History: Status History
Amendments: Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note


SB22-227 Continue Department Of Agriculture Spending Authority Agriculture Programs 
Comment:
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
News:
Short Title: Continue Department Of Agriculture Spending Authority Agriculture Programs
Sponsors: N. Hinrichsen / D. Valdez (D) | P. Will (R)
Summary:

The bill continues the spending authority granted to the department of agriculture as follows:

  • The $3 million appropriation in Senate Bill 21-235 from the agriculture value-added cash fund to make grants to implement renewable energy and energy efficiency projects, conduct energy audits, and provide technical assistance is continued through the end of the 2022-23 state fiscal year;
  • The $2.5 million appropriation in Senate Bill 21-203 from the general fund for use by the agricultural markets division for the Colorado proud program, is continued through the end of the 2023-24 state fiscal year; and
  • The $5 million appropriation in House Bill 21-1262 from the Colorado state fair authority cash fund for use by the Colorado state fair is continued through the end of the 2022-23 state fiscal year.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/18/2022 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Status History: Status History
Amendments:
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note