Arapahoe County 2024 Legislative Report
Bill # PositionShort TitleSponsorsBill SummaryStatus HistoryMost Recent StatusFiscal Note
HB24-1007Support Prohibit Residential Occupancy Limits M. Rutinel (D) | J. Mabrey (D) / T. Exum (D) | J. Gonzales (D) The act prohibits counties, cities and counties, and municipalities from limiting the number of people who may live together in a single dwelling based on familial relationship, while allowing local governments to implement residential occupancy limits based only on: Demonstrated health and safety standards, such as international building code standards, fire code regulations, or Colorado department of public health and environment wastewater and water quality standards; or Local, state, federal, or political subdivision affordable housing program guidelines. APPROVED by Governor April 15, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
1/30/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/2/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
2/5/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/6/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over to 02/09/2024 - No Amendments
2/9/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/12/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
3/12/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/18/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/19/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/20/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
3/28/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/8/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/9/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/10/2024 Sent to the Governor
4/15/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1017Support Bill of Rights for Foster Youth L. Daugherty (D) | J. Parenti (D) / R. Zenzinger (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act establishes a statutory bill of rights for children and youth (youth) in foster care in Colorado, including youth participating in the foster youth in transition program but excluding youth detained by or committed to the care and physical custody of the division of youth services. The office of the child's representative shall develop a written notice of the rights, and a county department of human or social services shall provide each youth who is 5 years of age or older with the written notice in the youth's primary language at the time of the youth's initial placement in foster care, at each placement change, and at least annually. APPROVED by Governor April 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
1/24/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
1/29/2024 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
1/30/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/6/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over to 02/09/2024 - No Amendments
2/9/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/28/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/28/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/4/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/19/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/19/2024 Sent to the Governor
4/24/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1019Support Crisis Resolution Team Program M. Bradfield (R) | J. Amabile (D) / R. Fields (D) | R. Pelton (R)  Legislative Oversight Committee Concerning the Treatment of Persons with Behavioral Health Disorders in the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Systems. Under current law, the department of human services (department) offers statewide access to crisis system services (services) for children and youth. The bill expands the services provided through the creation of the crisis resolution team program (program) in the department. The behavioral health administration (BHA) shall administer the program to provide community-based services to de-escalate and stabilize children or youth experiencing high-acuity behavioral health crises. The BHA shall contract with crisis resolution team providers (providers) to provide community-based de-escalation and stabilization services to children or youth. A child or youth is eligible for services provided by the program if the child or youth: Is 21 years of age or younger; Has experienced high-acuity behavioral health crises as identified by the behavioral health crisis response system or emergency departments; and Is safe to remain in the home or the community while receiving intensive, short-term stabilization interventions. Providers shall offer the following services to children or youth and their caregivers: Counseling or therapy; Case management to help meet treatment plans; Peer support or family skills coaching to foster connectedness, goal setting, and new routines to achieve positive, lasting change; Medication management; and Care coordination to provide tailored support and connection. Providers shall offer services to a child or youth a minimum of 3 days per week with a variety of services offered daily depending on the child's or youth's clinical needs. Services must be offered to the child or youth for a minimum of 4 weeks up to a maximum of 6 weeks depending on the child's or youth's clinical needs. The BHA shall: Maintain existing relationships with community partners; Conduct outreach and educate community partners regarding providers' services; Provide technical assistance to providers regarding specialized training and the use of screening and assessment tools; and Conduct an annual evaluation of the program. On or before September 1, 2025, the BHA shall submit to the general assembly a feasibility study to determine whether the program can be further expanded statewide. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
1/30/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1031Support Accessibility for Persons in Child Welfare Matters B. Bradley (R) | J. Joseph (D) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act requires that certain services provided to children or their families comply with the provisions of Title VI of the federal "Civil Rights Act of 1964" if they are provided by a county department of human or social services (county department), city and county, or a private-entity contractor. Furthermore, the act requires that the county department, city and county, or private-entity contractor take reasonable steps to ensure meaningful language access to services in the person's primary language for a person with limited English proficiency, in a timely manner and without unreasonable delay. The act requires a court to provide language access, including translation and interpretation services, to a child, parent, guardian, custodian, or other party in a dependency and neglect case if the person requests language access or has limited English proficiency. The act requires that during a dispositional hearing concerning the best interests of a child, the court consider services and programs that provide the parent and child with language access and effective communication. The act appropriates $74,953 from the judicial stabilization cash fund to the judicial department to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
1/30/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/26/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/29/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/30/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/23/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/23/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/23/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/3/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1038Support High-Acuity Crisis for Children & Youth M. Young (D) | B. Bradley (R) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Fields (D) The act requires the department of health care policy and financing (HCPF), in collaboration with the behavioral health administration (BHA) and the department of human services (CDHS), to develop a system of care (system of care) for children and youth who are less than 21 years of age and who have complex behavioral health needs. At a minimum, the system of care must include: Implementation of a standardized assessment tool; Intensive-care coordination; Expanded supportive services; and Expanded access to treatment foster care. The act requires HCPF to convene a leadership team that is responsible for the decision-making and oversight of the system of care and to convene an implementation team to create a plan to implement the system of care. The act requires CDHS and HCPF to report progress on the development and implementation of the system of care to the general assembly. The act creates the residential child care provider training academy in CDHS to create a pipeline of high-quality staff for residential child care providers and ensure that individuals hired to work at residential child care facilities receive the necessary training to perform the individual's job functions responsibly and effectively. The act requires CDHS to expand the number of treatment beds available for children and youth whose behavioral or mental health needs require services and treatment in a residential child care facility. The act requires CDHS to develop a system to establish and monitor quality standards for residential child care providers and ensure the quality standards are implemented into all levels of care that serve children and youth in out-of-home placement. The act requires CDHS to develop a system to incentivize residential child care providers to implement quality standards above CDHS' established minimum standards. The act requires CDHS to make publicly available on the department's website a directory of each residential child care provider's quality assurance. The CDHS program that provides emergency resources to certain licensed providers to help remove barriers the providers face in serving children and youth whose behavioral or mental health needs require services and treatment in a residential child care facility currently repeals on July 1, 2028. The act extends the program indefinitely and requires CDHS to contract with additional licensed providers for the delivery of services to children and youth who are eligible for and placed in the program. The act requires CDHS and the BHA to increase the minimum reimbursement rates paid to qualified residential treatment programs for the purpose of aligning room and board payments across payer sources. The act requires HCPF to contract with a third-party vendor to complete an actuarial analysis in order to determine the appropriate medicaid reimbursement rate for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. The act requires CDHS to contract with one or more third-party vendors to implement a pilot program to assess the needs of, and provide short-term residential services for, juvenile justice-involved youth who do not meet the criteria for detention. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates money to the department of human services and the department of health care policy and financing to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
1/31/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/12/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/15/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/29/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/6/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/15/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1046Support Child Welfare System Tools M. Duran (D) | G. Evans (R) / C. Kolker (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) Current law requires mandatory reporters to include certain information when reporting child abuse or neglect to the mandatory reporter's county department, local law enforcement, or through the statewide child abuse reporting hotline system (hotline system). The act requires a mandatory reporter to report any evidence of known domestic violence or intimate partner violence in the child's home, including any evidence of previous cases of known domestic violence or intimate partner violence in the child's home. The act requires the state department of human services (state department) to develop and implement a consistent screening process for a county department to follow, when possible, in responding to a report or inquiry to the hotline system. The screening process must include questions about domestic violence or intimate partner violence. The state department is required to develop and implement a disclosure procedure that notifies callers to the hotline system that calls are recorded. The act requires the state department to review the screening process used by county departments and hotline system operators to: Determine race; ethnicity; disability status; LGBTQ identity, if applicable; and English proficiency in a screening report and recommend a process for improving the accuracy of determining the demographic information, which must include opportunities to update the TRAILS statewide case management system; Understand the types of questions asked during the screening process to determine demographic information and recommend questions that reflect best practices and cultural competency; and Understand the sequence of questions asked during a screening process to determine demographic information and recommend a sequence of questions that better reflects best practices. The state department shall recommend and implement a screening process procedure to determine demographic information that reflects best practices and cultural competencies. No later than January 15, 2025, the office of the child protection ombudsman (ombudsman) shall select a third-party evaluator to conduct an audit on the Colorado family risk assessment (risk assessment) and the Colorado family safety assessment (safety assessment). In conducting an audit of the risk assessment, the third-party evaluator shall: Identify tools and resources to ensure the risk assessment is carried out consistently; Identify gaps and solutions to enable caseworkers to complete the risk assessment in real time while in the field; Examine the impacts of geography when using the risk assessment; Examine the impacts of race and ethnicity when using the risk assessment and how they affect communities that are over-represented in the child welfare system; Evaluate and recommend best practices for sharing the risk assessment with families, legal professionals, and the judicial branch; Evaluate and recommend best practices for training on the risk assessment; and Examine the risk assessment for domestic violence or intimate partner violence and recommend best practices. In conducting an audit of the safety assessment, the third-party evaluator shall: Examine the same issues set forth for the risk assessment; Study the inter-rater reliability of the safety assessment; and Study the required documentation for the planning and removal of a child from the child's primary caregiver. The third-party evaluator shall create a report summarizing the results of the audit. On or before March 1, 2026, the ombudsman is required to submit the audit report to the house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services committee and the senate health and human services committee, or their successor committees, the speaker of the house of representatives, the minority leader of the house of representatives, the president of the senate, and the minority leader of the senate. The act appropriates $109,392 from the general fund to the judicial department for use by the ombudsman to implement this act. APPROVED by Governor May 28, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 28, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/7/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/1/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/1/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/4/2024 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/7/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/27/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/28/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1083Monitor Construction Professional Insurance Coverage Transparency J. Willford (D) | K. Brown (D) / L. Cutter (D)  The bill requires the division of insurance (division) to conduct or cause to be conducted a study of construction liability insurance for construction professionals in Colorado. The study must identify the following: All insurers offering construction liability policies in Colorado (policies); The rates charged by insurers for policies and the basis for the rates, including data for the past 5 years, if available; Risk factors, classifications, and coverage descriptions insurers use to set policy rates; A comparison of the policy rates insurers charge with rates charged by other states in the region to cover similar residential projects; Policy coverage terms; and Common limitations or exclusions from policy coverage. The bill requires that, at least 14 days prior to closing the sale of a new residence, the seller of the residence provide the purchaser and the county clerk and recorder's office for the county where the new residence is located with information regarding the insurance coverage for the property subject to the sale, including: Identification of each policy and the coverage provider that may provide coverage for a construction professional's work on the residence; The amount of the policy limits for each policy identified; The policy period for each policy identified, including whether the policy provides coverage on a claims-made basis or occurrence basis; and Identification of relevant exclusions from coverage.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
1/25/2024 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1088Oppose Modifications to the Child Fatality Prevention Act T. Winter (R) / R. Pelton (R)  The "Child Fatality Prevention Act" establishes state and local or regional child fatality prevention review teams to conduct multidisciplinary reviews of child abuse, neglect, and fatalities. The bill: Repeals the requirement that a local or regional review team conduct reviews of child fatalities related to motor vehicle incidents; Requires that members of a local or regional review team be appointed by a board of county commissioners; Repeals the requirement that a local or regional review team review the cause and manner of a child fatality, as determined by the local coroner, pathologist, or medical examiner; Requires a local or regional review team to provide the parent or guardian of a deceased child with written notice of a review, an opportunity to be heard, and an opportunity to obtain legal representation during the review process; and Repeals the requirement that a state review team review a child fatality case that has not been reviewed by a local or regional review team.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/12/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/7/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
2/7/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1089Support Vehicle Electronic Notifications E. Hamrick (D) | L. Frizell (R) / R. Zenzinger (D) | R. Pelton (R) By March 31, 2026, the act requires the department of revenue (department) to create a process for a vehicle owner to request to receive and for the department to provide electronic communications and notifications, instead of written notifications, concerning vehicle transactions, including electronic notifications regarding driver's licenses and hearings related to the suspension of a driver's license, vehicle registration renewals, other hearings, and issuance of license plates. The department is not permitted, however, to provide electronic notifications for the revocation of a vehicle registration or license plate. The act also requires the department to adopt rules to create procedures for a vehicle owner to request the electronic notification. The act makes it mandatory, instead of optional, that the department establish a system to allow the electronic transmission of registration, lien, and titling information for motor vehicles, off-highway vehicles, or special mobile machinery by March 31, 2026. The act also requires that the system support the ability to generate a title and registration for new leased vehicles and support the ability to generate a title for a lessee who purchases the lessee's leased vehicle without affecting the lessee's existing registration. On or before January 1, 2027, the system must support the ability to generate a new registration for a vehicle to a new lessee without modifying the title. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $645,368 is appropriated from the Colorado DRIVES vehicle services account in the highway users tax fund to the department to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/12/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
3/11/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/15/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/15/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/18/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/20/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/9/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/16/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/16/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/17/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/19/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over to 04/22/2024
4/22/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Not Concur - Request Conference Committee
4/29/2024 First Conference Committee Result was to Adopt Rerevised w/ Amendments
4/30/2024 Senate Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
5/4/2024 House Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
5/29/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/29/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/29/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/3/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1098Support Cause Required for Eviction of Residential Tenant J. Mabrey (D) | M. Duran (D) / J. Gonzales (D) | N. Hinrichsen (D) With certain exceptions, the act prohibits a landlord from evicting a residential tenant unless the landlord has cause for eviction. Cause exists only when: A tenant or lessee is guilty of an unlawful detention of real property under certain circumstances described in existing law, as amended by the act; A tenant or lessee engages in conduct that creates a nuisance or disturbance that interferes with the quiet enjoyment of the landlord or other tenants at the property or an immediately adjacent property, or where the tenant negligently damaged the property; or Conditions exist constituting grounds for a "no-fault eviction". The following conditions constitute grounds for a "no-fault eviction" of a residential tenant, with certain limitations: Demolition or conversion of the residential premises; Substantial repairs or renovations to the residential premises; Occupancy of the residential premises is assumed by the landlord or a family member of the landlord; Withdrawal of the residential premises from the rental market for the purpose of selling the residential premises; A tenant refuses to sign a new lease with reasonable terms; and A tenant has a history of nonpayment of rent. If a landlord proceeds with an eviction of a tenant without cause, the tenant may seek relief as provided in existing laws concerning unlawful removal of a tenant and may assert the landlord's violation as an affirmative defense to an eviction proceeding. Current law allows a tenant to terminate a tenancy by serving written notice to the landlord within a prescribed time period, based on the length of the tenancy. For the purpose of such notices, certain provisions apply, including the following: Any person in possession of real property with the assent of the owner is presumed to be a tenant at will until the contrary is shown; and Certain provisions concerning notices to quit do not apply to the termination of a residential tenancy if the residential premises is a condominium unit. The act eliminates these provisions. Current law requires the management of a mobile home park to make a reasonable effort to notify a resident of the management's intention to enter the mobile home space at least 48 hours before entry. The act increases this notice period to 72 hours. APPROVED by Governor April 19, 2024 EFFECTIVE April 19, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/24/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/14/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/16/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/20/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/20/2024 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
2/26/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
3/7/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/12/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/15/2024 - No Amendments
3/15/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/18/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/21/2024 - No Amendments
3/22/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/25/2024 - No Amendments
3/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/26/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/27/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
3/28/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/8/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/9/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/10/2024 Sent to the Governor
4/19/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1100Support Coroner Qualifications S. Vigil (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D) The act requires a coroner of a county with a population greater than 150,000 who is elected on or after November 5, 2024, to be either a death investigator certified by and in good standing with the American board of medicolegal death investigators or a forensic pathologist certified by and in good standing with the American board of pathology. APPROVED by Governor April 11, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/25/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/13/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/16/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/20/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/23/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
3/21/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/26/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/8/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/9/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/10/2024 Sent to the Governor
4/11/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1107Support Judicial Review of Local Land Use Decision W. Lindstedt (D) | S. Bird (D) / J. Bridges (D) | F. Winter (D) The act requires a court to award reasonable attorney fees to a prevailing governmental entity in an action for judicial review of a local land use decision involving residential use with a net project density of 5 dwelling units per acre or more, except for an action brought by the land use applicant before the governmental entity. Filing an action for judicial review of a local land use decision does not affect the validity of the local land use decision. The act authorizes a governmental entity and the public to rely on the local land use decision in good faith for all purposes until the action for judicial review is resolved. APPROVED by Governor May 30, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 30, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/25/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/27/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/1/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/8/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/11/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/15/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
4/17/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/22/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/23/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/8/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/8/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/30/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1120Amend Resources for Persons in Child Welfare System G. Evans (R)  The bill requires that prior to adding a person found responsible for child abuse or neglect (person) to the automated child welfare system (system), a county department of human or social services must provide, within 14 days, a written notice to the person of the opportunity for a hearing to appeal the finding. The written notice must include, among other things: Information about the factual history of the case and detailed information about the appeals process; Information about how the person may obtain, at no cost to the person, a complete copy of the record that will be added to the system, subject to redactions required by law; Information about how the person may request a complete copy of the law enforcement record, if any, of the alleged incident of child abuse or neglect; Information about the office of the child protection ombudsman; and Information about the office of the respondent parents' counsel. When a hearing is requested, the bill requires an administrative law judge to contact the parties to schedule the hearing, which must take place no later than 120 days after the date the person requests a hearing. The bill describes the rights accorded to the person. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/26/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/20/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1152Monitor Accessory Dwelling Units J. Amabile (D) | R. Weinberg (R) / K. Mullica (D) | T. Exum (D) Section 1 of the act creates a series of requirements related to accessory dwelling units. Section 1 establishes unique requirements for subject jurisdictions and for qualifying as an accessory dwelling unit supportive jurisdiction (supportive jurisdiction). As established in section 1, a subject jurisdiction is either: A municipality that has a population of 1,000 or more and that is within the area of a metropolitan planning organization; or The portion of a county that is both within a census designated place with a population of forty thousand or more, as reported in the most recent decennial census, and within the area of a metropolitan planning organization. Section 1 requires a subject jurisdiction, on or after June 30, 2025, to allow, subject to an administrative approval process, one accessory dwelling unit as an accessory use to a single-unit detached dwelling in any part of the subject jurisdiction where the subject jurisdiction allows single-unit detached dwellings. Section 1 also prohibits, on or after June 30, 2025, subject jurisdictions from enacting or enforcing certain local laws or otherwise acting in certain ways that would restrict the construction or conversion of an accessory dwelling unit. In order to qualify as a supportive jurisdiction, a local government must submit a report on or before June 30, 2025, to the department of local affairs (department) demonstrating that the local government: Has complied with the accessory dwelling unit requirements section 1 imposes on subject jurisdictions as a subject jurisdiction or, if the local government is not a subject jurisdiction, as if the local government were a subject jurisdiction; and Has implemented one or more specified strategies to encourage and facilitate the construction or conversion of accessory dwelling units. Section 1 also creates the accessory dwelling unit fee reduction and encouragement grant program within the department. The purpose of this grant program is for the department to provide grants to supportive jurisdictions for offsetting costs incurred in connection with developing pre-approved accessory dwelling unit plans, providing technical assistance to persons converting or constructing accessory dwelling units, or waiving, reducing, or providing financial assistance for accessory dwelling unit associated fees and other required costs. In addition to providing grants, the department is required to develop a toolkit to support local governments in encouraging accessory dwelling unit construction. Section 1 requires the state treasurer to transfer $5 million to the accessory dwelling unit fee reduction and encouragement grant program fund created for purposes of implementing the grant program. Section 2 requires the department to create, and for local governments to consider and adopt, model public safety code requirements related to geographic or climatic conditions for factory-built structures, including those structures that would be considered accessory dwelling units. Section 3 grants the Colorado economic development commission the power to expend $8 million to contract with the Colorado housing and finance authority to operate and establish the following programs to benefit low- to moderate-income residents of supportive jurisdictions: An accessory dwelling unit credit enhancement program that supports lenders offering affordable loans to eligible low- and moderate-income borrowers for the construction or conversion of accessory dwelling units; A program that allows for the buying down of interest rates on loans made to eligible low- and moderate-income borrowers in connection with the construction or conversion of accessory dwelling units; A program that offers down payment assistance in connection with accessory dwelling units, principal reduction on loans to eligible low- and moderate-income borrowers made in connection with accessory dwelling units, or both; and A program through which the Colorado housing and finance authority offers loans, revolving lines of credit, or grants to eligible non-profits, public housing authorities, and community development financial institutions to make direct loans or grants to support the construction or conversion of accessory dwelling units for low- and moderate-income borrowers or tenants. Section 4 directs the state treasurer to transfer $8 million from the general fund to the Colorado economic development fund for the purpose of the contracting described in section 3. Section 5 prohibits a subject jurisdiction's planned unit development resolution or ordinance for a planned unit development from restricting the permitting of an accessory dwelling unit more than the local law that applies to accessory dwelling units outside of the planned unit development. Section 6 states, subject to a reasonable restriction exception, that any prohibition on accessory dwelling units or the implementation of restrictive design or dimension standards by a unit owners' association in a supportive jurisdiction is void as a matter of public policy. Section 7 makes appropriations to the department, the division of local government within the department, and the office of the governor for use by the office of information technology for the purpose of implementing the act. APPROVED by Governor May 13, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 13, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/30/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/27/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/12/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/14/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/23/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/1/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 05/02/2024 - No Amendments
5/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/03/2024 - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/04/2024 - No Amendments
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/6/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/7/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/9/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/9/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/9/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1170Support Rights for Youth Division of Youth Services Facilities J. Joseph (D) | D. Ortiz (D) / J. Gonzales (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act establishes in statute a bill of rights for youth who are the responsibility of the department of human services (department), whether the youth is detained or committed to the care and physical custody of a juvenile facility operated by the department. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/31/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/20/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/23/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/26/2024 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
2/28/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/11/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/16/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/16/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/17/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/28/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/28/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/28/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/4/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1173Monitor Electric Vehicle Charging System Permits A. Valdez (D) / K. Priola (D) | S. Jaquez Lewis (D) The act establishes permitting procedures for electric vehicle (EV) charging systems for counties with a population of 20,000 or more (covered county) and municipalities with a population of 10,000 or more (covered municipality). On or before December 31, 2025, a board of county commissioners of a covered county or the governing body of a covered municipality must do one of the following: Adopt an ordinance or resolution that incorporates the same standards and permitting process or less restrictive standards and permitting process as the standards and permitting process described in the Colorado energy office's EV charger permitting model code that the office is required to publish on or before March 31, 2025; Adopt an ordinance or resolution that establishes the covered county's or covered municipality's own objective standards and administrative review process to be used by the covered county or covered municipality permitting agency in the agency's review of EV charger permits, which ordinance or resolution must comply with certain requirements; or Adopt an ordinance or resolution that establishes that the covered county or covered municipality does not intend to adopt the EV charger model code or adopt the standards and administrative review process required by the act, but instead will continue to utilize the covered county's or covered municipality's existing permitting review process for EV charging systems. If a covered county or covered municipality establishes its own objective standards and administrative review process, the covered county or covered municipal permitting agency must provide a checklist to prospective applicants of all requirements that must be included in an application for an EV charger permit. The covered county or covered municipality may deny an application if the application does not comply with the objective standards for EV charging systems set forth by the covered county or covered municipality or for health or safety reasons. A covered county or covered municipality must also notify an EV charger permit applicant of the covered county permitting agency's or covered municipal permitting agency's decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny an applicant within 3 business days after the date the agency makes such determination. The Colorado energy office, in addition to developing the model code regarding the approval of EV charger permits, is required to provide covered counties and covered municipalities technical assistance in developing and administering the expedited EV charger permitting process. If a board of county commissioners of a covered county or governing body of a covered municipality adopts the model code, it is not subject to the other requirements specified in the act. APPROVED by Governor May 21, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/31/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
3/27/2024 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/17/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/18/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/19/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/23/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
4/29/2024 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/6/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 05/07/2024 - No Amendments
5/7/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/8/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/8/2024 House Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Reconsider - CC requested but not assented
5/8/2024 House Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Reconsider
5/8/2024 House Recalled Bill From Senate
5/8/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Not Concur - Request Conference Committee
5/15/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/21/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1216Amend Supports for Youth in Juvenile Justice System J. Bacon (D) | T. Hernandez (D) / J. Coleman (D) The act establishes a bill of rights for a K-12 student who is involved in any capacity with the juvenile or criminal justice system (justice-engaged student). School districts, boards of cooperative services, charter schools, and institute charter schools (local education providers) must follow the bill of rights for justice-engaged students. The bill of rights includes, but is not limited to: Providing the justice-engaged student with alternative solutions to a general education, when appropriate; Prompt enrollment or re-enrollment no later than 10 business days after the first request to the local education provider, so long as the student is eligible for enrollment, as determined by the local education provider; Appropriate credit for coursework completed while justice-engaged, and for that coursework to be applied toward graduation or school continuation; Providing the justice-engaged student with a graduation plan, developed in consultation with the justice-engaged student, the student's family, caregiver or advocate; Privacy, including privacy when related to diversion, probation, or questioning about a crime; Protection by the federal "Individuals with Disabilities Act", section 504 of the federal "Rehabilitation Act of 1973", applicable foster care regulations, and the federal "McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act"; Creating evidence of and being evaluated for giftedness; and Allowing the justice-engaged student to participate in school activities or career readiness pathways in accordance with rules promulgated by the state board of education (board). Each local education provider shall publish on its website an explanation of the services and resources available for justice-engaged students, including the name, phone number, and email address of a designated, trained point-of-contact person (contact person) at the local education provider. For small and rural school districts that are not members of a BOCES, a designated support person within the department of education (department) may act as a contact person. The contact person shall read and understand the guidance developed by the department and be knowledgeable about alternative education options and wraparound services. Upon notification or request, a local education provider will work with the team of professionals, including the multi-tiered systems of supports, and appropriate intervention teams, families, and justice-engaged students to ensure a pathway to graduation, including workforce development opportunities, access to alternative educational programming, and mental health and other supports as and if appropriate and available. On or before July 1, 2024, the department shall convene an interagency working group to review and make recommendations to the department and joint education committees of the house of representatives and the senate no later than December 1, 2024 regarding justice-engaged students. The board shall promulgate rules to establish a process and framework for interpreting and transferring credits and schoolwork completed by a justice-engaged student while in custody. Local education providers retain the right to suspend or expel a justice-engaged student pursuant to applicable laws. The department shall provide guidance to local education providers on how to allow a justice-engaged student to receive an accommodation to participate in school activities, including, but not limited to, graduation ceremonies, sporting events, after-school activities, and college or career readiness pathways. On or before September 1, 2026, the act requires the department to select and contract with an entity to establish and maintain a statewide hotline for justice-engaged students, families and caregivers, justice system personnel, and education personnel. Each justice-engaged student shall be provided information about the hotline by law enforcement after ticketing or arrest, by the division of youth services after release from the division, and by local education providers after notification that a student has become justice-engaged. The act requires the entity operating the hotline to submit a written report to the department and board on or before June 30, 2025, and each June 30 thereafter. The report must categorize and summarize the number of calls received, the type of person calling, types of supports or referrals provided, and the geography of calls received so that service gaps can be identified. Beginning July 1, 2025, the department shall assist students from small and rural school districts who have been denied re-entry into school by a local education provider. Under current law, if a child or youth is within a court's jurisdiction, a preliminary investigation is made to determine whether further actions be taken to protect the interests of the child or youth or the community. The court or judge or magistrate is encouraged to take into consideration a juvenile's educational progress and ability to achieve credits toward graduation when considering release options. If the court commits a justice-engaged student to the department of human services who does not include a physical threat or bodily injury to another person, the court is encouraged to order that the commitment take place in a manner that allows the justice-engaged student to continue to attend school prior to commitment to avoid disruption of the justice-engaged student's academic progress and ability to achieve credits for a semester. The act appropriates $82,883 from the general fund for the 2024-25 state fiscal year to the department of education for use by student pathways. APPROVED by Governor May 31, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/5/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Education
3/7/2024 House Committee on Education Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/26/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/29/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/30/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Education
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on Education Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/3/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/4/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/6/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/28/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/28/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/28/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/31/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1223Amend Improved Access to the Child Care Assistance Program J. Willford (D) | L. Garcia (D) / L. Cutter (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act overhauls the Colorado child care assistance program (CCCAP). The act simplifies the application process by: Limiting the application requirements to only what is necessary to determine eligibility; Prohibiting counties from adding eligibility requirements; and Requiring recipients to provide only information that has changed when applying for redetermination. Income qualifications are changed to correspond with universal preschool program requirements. A county may exclude state and federal assistance program income eligibility guidelines in eligibility determinations. An employee of a child care provider may apply to the CCCAP and be granted full benefits for children from 6 weeks of age to 13 years of age, regardless of the employee's income. The act directs that child care providers be paid based on enrollment and not on attendance and be paid a weekly rate in advance. Employers are permitted to cover copayments, and copayments are limited to 7% of a family's income. The act authorizes grants and contracts for underserved populations. Starting July 1, 2025, the department shall create a pilot program for unlicensed providers to seek license-exempt status and establishment as an eligible CCCAP provider separate and distinct from the parent-initiated process. A CCCAP recipient is required to engage in an eligible activity to receive benefits. The act includes substance use disorder treatment programs, job training, and education activities as eligible activities. The department of early childhood education, in consultation with the department of public health and environment, shall conduct or contract for a study to determine the feasibility of de-linking eligibility for the federal child and adult care food program from the CCCAP. The act appropriates $100,000 from the general fund to the department of early childhood for the child and adult care food program study. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 4, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/7/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/12/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/1/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/3/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/7/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/7/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/28/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/28/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/28/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/4/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1229Amend Presumptive Eligibility for Long-Term Care R. English (D) / K. Mullica (D) | P. Will (R) Beginning January 1, 2026, the act removes the requirement that the department of health care policy and financing (department) fully assess a person in need of long-term services and supports for the appropriate level of care before the person is presumed eligible for the medical assistance program. The act authorizes the department to make any necessary changes to any other federal authorizations that are authorized by the federal centers for medicare and medicaid services in order to implement the presumptive eligibility requirements for persons in need of long-term services and supports. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE January 1, 2026(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/12/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/6/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/11/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/15/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/18/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/19/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/11/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/16/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/15/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/3/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1230Monitor Protections for Real Property Owners J. Parenti (D) | J. Bacon (D) / F. Winter (D) | L. Cutter (D)  Current law declares void any express waivers of or limitations on the legal rights or remedies provided by the "Construction Defect Action Reform Act" or the "Colorado Consumer Protection Act". Sections 1 and 4 make it a violation of the "Colorado Consumer Protection Act" to obtain or attempt to obtain a waiver or limitation that violates the aforementioned current law. Section 4 also requires a court to award to a claimant that prevails in a claim arising from alleged defects in a residential property construction, in addition to actual damages, prejudgment interest on the claim at a rate of 6% from the date the work is finished to the date it is sold to an occupant and 8% thereafter. Current law requires that a lawsuit against an architect, a contractor, a builder or builder vendor, an engineer, or an inspector performing or furnishing the design, planning, supervision, inspection, construction, or observation of construction of an improvement to real property must be brought within 6 years after the claim arises. Section 2 increases the amount of time in which a lawsuit may be brought from 6 to 10 years. Current law also provides that a claim of relief arises when a defect's physical manifestation was discovered or should have been discovered. Section 2 also changes the time when a claim of relief arises to include both the discovery of the physical manifestation and the cause of the defect. Section 3 voids a provision in a real estate contract that prohibits group lawsuits against a construction professional. Section 5 of the bill prohibits governing documents of a common interest community from setting different or additional requirements than those in current law for a construction defect action.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/12/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
3/6/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/11/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/22/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/25/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/4/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/8/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/16/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/22/2024 - No Amendments
4/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/24/2024 - No Amendments
4/24/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/25/2024 - No Amendments
4/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/26/2024 - No Amendments
4/26/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/29/2024 - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/30/2024 - No Amendments
4/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/01/2024 - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/02/2024 - No Amendments
5/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/03/2024 - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/04/2024 - No Amendments
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/07/2024 - No Amendments
5/7/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/09/2024 - No Amendments

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1235Support Reduce Aviation Impacts on Communities K. Brown (D) | S. Bird (D) / S. Fenberg (D) | R. Zenzinger (D) Section 2 of the act creates a state income tax credit for owners of aircraft that incur qualifying expenses to enable an aircraft that is powered by leaded aviation gasoline to be certified to instead be powered by unleaded aviation gasoline. Sections 3 and 6 provide explicit authority in the existing state aviation grant program for aviation fund grants: To general aviation airports and commercial airports at which there is significant general aviation activity to fund the design, engineering, construction, installation, acquisition, and inspection of infrastructure, including equipment, that allows the sale of unleaded aviation gasoline at such airports and to subsidize purchases of unleaded aviation gasoline at such airports; For airport noise monitoring devices; For evaluation, provision of education and technical assistance to airports about, prevention, or mitigation of adverse impacts to the health, safety, and welfare of individuals who reside or work near an airport; and At a time that electric aircraft technology has been appropriately certified by the federal aviation administration, for on-airport electric aircraft charging infrastructure. Section 6 also: Requires the lesser of 10% of the amount awarded in grants per year or $1,500,000 per year in grants to be designated for the aviation purposes of aiding and accelerating the transition from leaded aviation gasoline to unleaded aviation gasoline with priority given to airports with significant general aviation traffic in urban and suburban areas where surrounding communities may be disproportionately impacted by such traffic; and Subject to specified exceptions, prohibits grants from being awarded to an airport that is located in a densely populated residential area or has a significant number of flights over a densely populated residential area unless the airport or entity operating the airport demonstrates to the satisfaction of the aeronautics division of the department of transportation (division) that: By January 1, 2026, it has adopted a plan, in accordance with applicable federal requirements and guidance, for phasing out sales of leaded aviation gasoline at the airport by January 1, 2030; It has established, in consultation with flight schools and pilots that regularly use the airport, a voluntary noise abatement plan that meets specified requirements; and It complies with the requirements of any avigation easements or contracts that it has entered into. Section 4 adds to the division's duties: Working with the department of public health and environment (CDPHE) as it continues to provide data and information about the effects of leaded aviation fuel on human health to the department of transportation and airports; and Educating airports with significant general aviation activity, as determined by the division, regarding: The need to expedite the transition from leaded aviation gasoline to unleaded aviation gasoline; and Specified funding opportunities for projects and unleaded aviation gasoline subsidies, if offered by the division, that support the transition from leaded aviation gasoline to unleaded aviation gasoline and impose requirements for accessing that funding and, if offered, those subsidies. Section 5 increases the Colorado aeronautical board (board) from 7 to 9 voting members by requiring the appointment of 2 members who are residents of communities that are affected by general aviation airport traffic or traffic at a commercial airport at which there is significant general aviation activity and makes the executive director of CDPHE, or the executive director's designee, an ex officio nonvoting member of the board. In appointing the 2 new voting members, the governor is required to give priority to individuals who are not trained pilots, are familiar with airport infrastructure, aviation, and the mission of the board, and reside in a community that is significantly impacted by noise or lead emissions by a high-traffic airport with significant general aviation activity. The governor is also required to make appointments to the board so as to ensure a balance broadly representative of the activity level of airports throughout the state and further ensure that the racial, ethnic, and gender makeup of the board is representative of communities that are disproportionately impacted by general aviation airport traffic or traffic at a commercial airport at which there is significant general aviation activity. Section 7 requires the division to evaluate, educate, and provide technical assistance to airports about the adverse impacts of aircraft noise on health, safety, and welfare and requires the division to prioritize these activities at airports with significant general aviation activity that are located in densely populated residential areas or have a significant number of flights over such areas. Section 8 appropriates $44,609 from the general fund to the department of revenue and reappropriates $2,591 of the appropriation to the department of personnel for implementation of the act. APPROVED by Governor May 17, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 17, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/12/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/6/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Finance
3/18/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/12/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/15/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/16/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/17/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/19/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/23/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/26/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/13/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/14/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1239Oppose Single-Exit Stairway Multifamily Structure A. Valdez (D) | A. Boesenecker (D) / K. Priola (D)  On or before December 1, 2026, the bill requires a board of county commissioners or the governing body of a municipality to adopt a building code, or amend an existing building code, to allow up to 5 stories of a multifamily residential building to be served by a single exit. To satisfy this requirement, a local government shall incorporate by reference and adopt or adapt and adopt language from a portion of an existing building code that allows a single exit to serve no more than 5 stories of a group r-2 occupancy in the same building. If a local government so requests, the department of local affairs shall provide technical assistance to the local government in satisfying this requirement. The bill also clarifies that the adoption or amendment of a building code to satisfy the requirements of the bill does not qualify as adopting or enforcing a building code for the purpose of determining whether a board of county commissioners or the governing body of a municipality is required to adopt an energy code. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/12/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/10/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1260Monitor Prohibition Against Employee Discipline M. Duran (D) | T. Hernandez (D) / J. Danielson (D) The act prohibits an employer from subjecting or threatening to subject an employee to discipline, discharge, or an adverse employment action on account of the employee's refusal to attend or participate in an employer-sponsored meeting concerning religious or political matters or for declining to listen to the speech of or view religious or political communications from the employer or the agent, representative, or designee of the employer. With regard to state employees, the prohibitions apply only to meetings and communications relating to state employees' decisions to join or support a fraternal or labor organization. Certain employer communications are exempt from the prohibition, including communications: Required by law, a court order, or an agreement with a governmental entity to communicate to employees, but only to the extent of a legal requirement; That are necessary for an employee to perform the employee's job duties; or That are required to prevent unlawful discrimination or harassment. Certain communications from institutions of higher education and K-12 schools and school districts are also exempt when the communication is related to coursework, symposia, or an academic program. The act does not apply to certain religious corporations, entities, associations, educational institutions, societies, or nonprofit faith-based health systems or facilities. The act authorizes an aggrieved person to seek relief by filing a complaint with the department of labor and employment (department) or by filing an action in district court after the person has exhausted all administrative remedies and has filed a complaint with the department. The act also creates an affirmative defense for employers. Each employer is required to distribute, at the employer's workplace or through e-mail or a regularly used communication system, a notice to each employee of the employee rights outlined in the act. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $278,564 is appropriated from the general fund to the department for use by the division of labor standards and statistics to implement the act. VETOED by Governor May 17, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/13/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
3/20/2024 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/19/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/22/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/29/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/3/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/13/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/14/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2024 Governor Vetoed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1266Support Local Government Utility Relocation in Right-of-Way E. Hamrick (D) | L. Frizell (R) / R. Zenzinger (D) The act establishes a process by which local governments and investor-owned utility companies with more than 250,000 customers may coordinate on utility relocation work that is necessitated by a road improvement project. A road improvement project does not include a project in a roadway under the control of the Colorado department of transportation (CDOT) unless the construction is performed by or under the direction of the local government pursuant to an agreement with CDOT. Under the process established by the act, a local government is required to notify any affected utility company of the details of a road improvement project before beginning the project and in the event of a change in the scope of the proposed project. These details include the proposed design, funding details, the specifics of the utility conflict, and the estimated timeline for the road improvement project and utility relocation. If local governments and utility companies so choose, they may coordinate on road improvement projects necessitating the removal, relocation, or alteration of utility lines in a local government's right-of-way and commit to a schedule for utility relocation by means of a clearance letter. The required components for a clearance letter include the scope of the utility relocation, schedule and coordination requirements for the utility relocation, accountability for traffic management and the discovery of hazardous materials, a dispute resolution mechanism, and requirements for prompt performance, staking, and project approval. A clearance letter must also provide that the utility company pay for actual damages associated with its delay in the performance of the utility relocation, except those caused by a force majeure, the discovery of hazardous materials, or a change in the scope or schedule of the road improvement project. The act also outlines the timeline and process for a local government to accept or reject a completed utility relocation. The utility relocation coordination process outlined by the act does not prevent a local government from pursuing alterative arrangements for road improvement projects, in which case the local government and utility company need not follow the process requirements outlined in the act. The act does not cover a local government that has granted a franchise to a utility company and does not alter the terms of any franchise or license granted pursuant to statute or the state constitution. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/13/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/13/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/15/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/18/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/22/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/16/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/22/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/23/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/30/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/29/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/29/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/29/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/3/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1280Support Welcome, Reception, & Integration Grant Program E. Velasco (D) | L. Garcia (D) / R. Fields (D) | L. Cutter (D) The act creates the statewide welcome, reception, and integration grant program (grant program) in the department of labor and employment (department) to provide grants to community-based organizations that provide culturally and linguistically appropriate navigation of services and programs to migrants who are within one year of arrival in the United States. A grant may be used for: Conducting an intake and assessment of needs; Providing cultural orientation; case management; employment services or referrals to employment services; housing, housing-related services, or referrals to housing; English as a second language classes or referrals to classes; financial orientation; referrals to mental and physical health services and disability services; interpretation and translation services; transportation services; and immigration legal assistance or referrals to immigration legal services; Distributing emergency and transitional supplies; Assisting migrant parents to enroll their children in public school or summer programs, including early childhood programs; and Other eligible expenses. The act requires the department to issue a request for proposal for a nonprofit organization to administer the grant program. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $2.5 million from the general fund to the department for the grant program. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/13/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
3/6/2024 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/17/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/19/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/20/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/22/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/1/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/6/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 05/07/2024 - No Amendments
5/7/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/29/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/29/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/29/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1296Monitor Modifications to the Colorado Open Records Act C. Kipp (D) | M. Soper (R) / J. Marchman (D)  The bill makes the following changes to the "Colorado Open Records Act" (CORA): Requires a custodian to evaluate a request for public records promptly and for no longer than 2 days. Within the 2-day period the custodian shall notify the requester whether or not any costs or fees that may apply to the request and if extenuating circumstances exist that allow for an extension of the reasonable time to respond to a CORA request (response period). If there are costs or fees that may apply, the response period does not begin until the custodian receives a response from the requester acknowledging acceptance of the costs or fees. Alternatively, a requester may revise their request and the custodian shall evaluate the revised request within the 2-day evaluation period. Otherwise, the response period begins after the custodian has provided notice to the requester. Changes the reasonable time to respond to a CORA request, except for requests from a mass medium or a newsperson, from 3 working days to 5 working days and changes the extension of time for the response period if extenuating circumstances exist from not exceeding 7 additional days to not exceeding 10 additional days; Adds an extenuating circumstance that allows for an extension of the response period when the custodian is not scheduled to work within the response period; Requires public entities to post any rules or policies adopted pursuant to CORA, including what the public entity's records retention policy, and to post information for members of the public regarding how to make a public records request; If public records are in the sole and exclusive custody and control of someone who is not scheduled to work within the response period, a custodian shall provide all other available responsive public records within the response period and notify the requester of the earliest date on which the person is scheduled to return to work and make best efforts to make responsive records available for inspection within the response period or extended response period, as applicable expected to be available or that the person is not expected to return to work . The requester may make a subsequent request for additional responsive records, if any, on or after the date the person who is authorized to have custody and control of the records is scheduled to return to work custodian provides . Allows a custodian to determine that a requester is a vexatious requester, requires the custodian to make a sworn statement in support of the determination to provide to the requester, allows the custodian a 30-day response period when a requester is a vexatious requester, and permits the requester to appeal the determination that the requester is a vexatious requester to the district court; Excludes a mass medium or newsperson from being a vexatious requester; Allows a custodian , subject to certain exceptions, to determine that a request is made for the direct solicitation of business for pecuniary gain, requires the custodian to make a sworn statement in support provide written notice of the determination to provide to the requester, allows the custodian a 30-day response period for such a request, permits the requester to submit a signed statement affirming the request is not for the direct solicitation of business for pecuniary gain which the custodian must consider in making their determination, permits the requester to appeal the determination that the request is made for the direct solicitation of business for pecuniary gain to the district court, and allows a custodian to charge the requester for the full cost of responding to the request notwithstanding the allowance for the first hour of research and retrieval to otherwise be free of charge and notwithstanding the statutory cap on fees, which otherwise would apply; Prohibits disclosure of any other contact information of students in any public elementary or secondary school in addition to the prohibition of disclosure of addresses and telephone numbers that is in current law; Allows a custodian to deny the right of inspection of public records that are an employee's calendar, unless the public record is an elected official's calendar or the calendar of an employee who is in a leadership position or the request is made by a mass medium or newsperson; and Clarifies that if a custodian imposes any requirements concerning the pre-payment of fees or the payment of fees in connection with a request for inspection of public records, the requirements must be in accordance with the custodian's adopted rules or written policies and must not be inconsistent with the provisions of CORA; and Allows a custodian to treat a CORA request made within 14 calendar days of another CORA request made by the same person as one request for purposes of calculating the fee that the custodian may charge to the requester for research and retrieval of responsive public records. In addition, the bill requires that members of the general assembly retain public records for a minimum of 60 days. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  2/14/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
3/4/2024 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/12/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/15/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/19/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/20/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1304Monitor Minimum Parking Requirements S. Vigil (D) | S. Woodrow (D) / K. Priola (D) | N. Hinrichsen (D) The act prohibits a municipality that is within a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) or a county that has unincorporated areas within an MPO (local government), on or after June 30, 2025, from enacting or enforcing minimum parking requirements that apply to a land use approval for a multi-family residential development, adaptive re-use for residential purposes, or adaptive re-use mixed-use purposes which include at least 50% of use for residential purposes that is within, as applicable, the unincorporated area of the county or the municipality, within a metropolitan planning organization, and at least partially within an applicable transit service area. An applicable transit service area is an area identified by a map published by the department of local affairs as an area that is one-quarter mile of certain transit stops. The prohibition on enacting or enforcing minimum parking requirements does not lower the protections provided for persons with disabilities or prohibit a local government from: Enacting or enforcing a maximum parking requirement; Enforcing any agreement made before the effective date of the act in connection with a land use approval to provide regulated affordable housing in exchange for reducing minimum parking requirements; Being awarded funding for affordable housing that requires a ratio of a certain number of parking spaces; Enacting or enforcing a minimum parking requirement for bicycles; or Imposing the following requirements on a parking space that is voluntarily provided in connection with a development project: That the owners of such a parking space charge for the use of the space; That the owner of such a parking space contribute to a parking enterprise, permitting system, or shared parking plan; and That such a parking space allow for electric vehicle charging stations in accordance with existing law. Furthermore, notwithstanding the prohibition on enacting or enforcing minimum parking requirements, a local government may impose or enforce a minimum parking requirement in connection with a housing development project that is intended to contain twenty unity or more or contain regulated affordable housing. To impose or enforce such a minimum parking requirement, a county or municipality must publish certain written findings and annually report to the department of local affairs. Lastly, the act requires the department of local affairs: In consultation with the department of transportation, and the Colorado energy office, to develop and publish best practices and technical assistance materials concerning optimizing parking supply and managing parking; and In consultation with the department of transportation, the Colorado energy office, metropolitan planning organizations, and transit agencies that operate within metropolitan planning organizations, to publish a map that designates applicable transit service areas to be used by local governments in complying with the act. APPROVED by Governor May 10, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/14/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/5/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/12/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/15/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/16/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/17/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/25/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/29/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/30/2024 - No Amendments
4/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/01/2024 - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/02/2024 - No Amendments
5/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/03/2024 - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/4/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/5/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/6/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/8/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/8/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/8/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1313Monitor Housing in Transit-Oriented Communities S. Woodrow (D) | I. Jodeh (D) / C. Hansen (D) | F. Winter (D) Section 1 of the act establishes a category of local government: A transit-oriented community. As defined in the act, a transit-oriented community is either a local government that: Is either entirely or partially within a metropolitan planning organization; Has a population of 4,000 or more; and Contains at least 75 acres of certain transit-related areas; or If the local government is a county, contains either a part of: A transit station area that is both in an unincorporated part of the county and within one-half mile of a station that serves a commuter rail service or light rail service; or A transit corridor area that both is in an unincorporated part of the county and is fully encompassed by one or more municipalities. The act requires a transit-oriented community to meet its housing opportunity goal. A housing opportunity goal is a zoning capacity goal determined based on an average zoned housing density of 40 dwelling units per acre multiplied by the number of acres of transit-related areas within a transit-oriented community. On or before September 30, 2024, the department of local affairs (department) shall develop a map that identifies the transit-related areas necessary for the calculation of a housing opportunity goal and the various reports required by the act. To accomplish its housing opportunity goal, a transit-oriented community shall ensure that the zoning capacity within certain areas of the transit-oriented community meets or exceeds the transit-oriented community's housing opportunity goal. The main category of area that the act requires a transit-oriented community to increase the zoning capacity of to meet the transit-oriented community's housing opportunity goal is a transit center. In order to qualify as a transit center, an area must: Be composed of zoning districts that uniformly allow a net housing density of at least 15 units per acre; Identify the effective net housing density for the area by accounting for dimensional or other restrictions used to regulate density in the area, accounting for minimum parking requirements, and assuming an average housing unit size; Not include any area where local law exclusively restricts housing occupancy based on age or other factors; Have an administrative approval process for multifamily residential property development on parcels that are 5 acres or less in size; and Be located wholly or partially within a transit area or optional transit area and not extend more than one-quarter mile from the edge of a transit area or optional transit area. In addition to designating an area as a transit center for purposes of meeting a housing opportunity goal, the act allows local governments to designate areas as neighborhood centers for that purpose. The act requires transit-oriented communities to submit a series of reports to the department regarding the calculation, satisfaction, and implementation of a transit-oriented community's housing opportunity goal. The act requires a transit-oriented community to submit the following to the department: On or before June 30, 2025, a preliminary transit-oriented community assessment report to the department that includes the transit-oriented community's housing opportunity goal, the data and method used to calculate that housing opportunity goal, and the areas within the transit-oriented community that may need to be zoned to accomplish that housing opportunity goal; On or before December 31, 2026, an identification of the affordability strategies from the standard and long-term affordability strategies menus in the act that the transit-oriented community will implement; On or before December 31, 2026, an identification of the displacement mitigation strategies from the long-term displacement mitigation strategies menus in the act that the transit-oriented community will implement; and On or before December 31, 2026, a housing opportunity goal report for the department's review and approval that demonstrates that the transit-oriented community has met its housing opportunity goal and complied with the affordability and displacement mitigation requirements of the act. Additionally, on or before December 31, 2026, a transit-oriented community may notify the department that the transit-oriented community has an insufficient water supply to accomplish its housing opportunity goal, and the transit-oriented community may make a corresponding request for the department to modify the transit-oriented community's housing opportunity goal. If the department approves a transit-oriented community's housing opportunity goal report on or before December 31, 2027, the department shall designate the transit-oriented community as a certified transit-oriented community. A certified transit-oriented community is the only eligible entity for the transit-oriented communities infrastructure fund grant program (grant program) created within the department. The purpose of the grant program is to assist transit-oriented communities in upgrading infrastructure within transit centers and neighborhood centers. In administering the grant program, the department shall prioritize grant applicants based on the information in the reports described in the act. Grants from the grant program are awarded from money in the transit-oriented communities infrastructure fund (fund). The fund consists of gifts, grants, and donations along with money that the general assembly may appropriate or transfer to the fund and money in the account described in the act. The fund is continuously appropriated. On July 1, 2024, the state treasurer shall transfer $35 million from the general fund to the fund. Section 2 prohibits a planned unit development resolution or ordinance that is adopted on or after the effective date of the act and that applies within a transit center or neighborhood center from restricting the development of housing more than the local law that applies to that transit center or neighborhood center. Section 3 requires a local government, when requiring a real property owner to dedicate real property to the public, to provide a private property owner the option of paying a fee, rather than dedicating the private real property to the public, if the real property does not meet local government standards for dedication. Section 4 makes any restriction by a unit owners' association within a transit center or neighborhood center on the development of housing that is adopted on or after the effective date of the act and is beyond the local law that applies to that transit center or neighborhood center void as a matter of public policy. Section 5 requires the department of transportation to conduct a study that identifies both: Policy barriers and opportunities within the department of transportation including an examination of policies within the state access code, roadway design standards, and the treatment of pedestrian and bicycle crossings. The study must examine the impact of these policies on neighborhood centers and transit centers; and The portions of state highway that pass through locally-identified transit centers and neighborhood centers that are appropriate for context-sensitive design, complete streets. In addition to the $35 million appropriated to the fund, section 7 makes 2 appropriations. First, section 7 appropriates $183,138 to the governor for use by the Colorado energy office to implement the act. Second, section 7 appropriates $70,000 to the governor for use by the office of information technology to provide information services for the department. APPROVED by Governor May 13, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 13, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/20/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/6/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Finance
3/25/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/12/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/14/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/30/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/3/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 05/04/2024 - No Amendments
5/4/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/7/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/9/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/9/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/9/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/13/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1322Support Medicaid Coverage Housing & Nutrition Services K. Brown (D) | S. Bird (D) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Rodriguez (D) The act directs the department of health care policy and financing (state department) to conduct a feasibility study (study) to explore seeking federal authorization to provide nutrition, housing, and tenant supportive services that address medicaid members' health-related social needs (HRSN). The state department shall report the study's findings to the joint budget committee on or before November 10, 2024. The study and report must address integrating HRSN services with existing nutrition-related, housing-related, and tenant supportive services. The act requires the state department to seek federal authorization to provide HRSN services no later than July 1, 2025, if seeking federal authorization would be budget neutral to the general fund. The act appropriates $222,920 from the general fund to the state department for use by the executive director's office (office). From this appropriation, the office may use $67,070 for personal services, $3,975 for operating expenses, and $151,875 for general professional services and special projects. The act anticipates that the state department will receive $222,919 in federal funds for the act's implementation. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/20/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/5/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/19/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/20/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/22/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/22/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/31/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1362Monitor Measures to Incentivize Graywater Use M. Lukens (D) | M. Catlin (R) / D. Roberts (D) | C. Simpson (R) Under current law, a board of county commissioners or governing body of a municipality (local government) may authorize the use of graywater within its jurisdiction. Graywater refers to certain types of wastewater that is collected from fixtures before it is treated and put to certain beneficial uses. The act authorizes the installation of graywater treatment works in new construction projects and the use of graywater statewide; except that a local government: May adopt an ordinance or a resolution prohibiting the installation of graywater treatment works or the use of all graywater or categories of graywater use within its jurisdiction; and Shall notify the division of administration in the department of public health and environment of any such local ordinance or resolution adopted and of any local ordinance or resolution adopted that authorizes a use of graywater previously prohibited. APPROVED by Governor May 29, 2024 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2026(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/6/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Agriculture, Water & Natural Resources
3/25/2024 House Committee on Agriculture, Water & Natural Resources Refer Amended to Finance
4/3/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/4/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/5/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/8/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
4/18/2024 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/22/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/23/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/30/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/29/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1366Monitor Sustainable Local Government Community Planning M. Froelich (D) | K. Brown (D)  Section 1 of the bill requires state agencies to prioritize awarding grants that satisfy a list of criteria described in the bill. Sections 2 and 3 require, beginning January 1, 2025, upon updating a county or municipal master plan, a county or municipality (local government) to include a climate action element in its master plan. A climate action element must include climate-related goals, plans, or strategies and a description of any money from the federal, state, or a local government that a local government has received for the implementation of any of the plans or goals described in the climate action element. The bill requires a local government to provide the Colorado energy office (office) with the climate action element and then requires the office to deliver a copy of any climate element it receives to the department of local affairs, the Colorado department of transportation (CDOT), and any other state agency that the office determines. Section 4 requires CDOT to coordinate with metropolitan planning organizations to establish criteria that define growth corridors and identify these growth corridors. Having identified these growth corridors, the department and metropolitan planning organizations shall coordinate with local governments to develop transportation demand management plans for these growth corridors. Section 5 makes 2 changes related to the statewide transportation plan. First, the bill requires the statewide transportation plan to include: An examination of the impact of transportation decisions on land use patterns; The identification of highway segments where promotion of context-sensitive highway permitting and design can encourage the development of dense, walkable, and mixed-use neighborhoods in transit-oriented centers and neighborhood centers; and An emphasis on integrating planning efforts within CDOT to support multimodal transportation, neighborhood centers, and transit-oriented centers in infill areas as well as growth corridors through the associated transportation demand management corridor planning. Second, the bill requires CDOT to conduct a study in connection with the statewide transportation plan that identifies: Policy barriers and opportunities for the implementation of context-sensitive design, complete streets, and pedestrian-bicycle safety measures in locally-identified urban centers and neighborhood centers; and The portions of state highways that pass through locally identified transit-oriented centers and neighborhood centers that are candidates for context-sensitive design, complete streets, and pedestrian-bicycle safety measures.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  3/11/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/16/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1371Monitor More Uniform Local Massage Facilities Regulation A. Hartsook (R) | M. Lukens (D) / R. Fields (D) | B. Gardner (R) The law has allowed, but has not required, a county or a municipality to adopt a resolution or ordinance that either establishes business licensure requirements for massage facilities or regulates and prohibits unlawful activities to prevent the operation of illicit massage businesses that engage in human trafficking-related offenses. The act: Makes a legislative finding and declaration that it is a matter of mixed statewide and local concern to establish a statewide requirement that a massage facility operator, owner, or employee, including an independent contractor who is involved in the routine operations of a massage facility (employee), submit to a background check, which generally means a fingerprint-based criminal history record check (background check); Requires every county, city and county, and municipality (local government) that has a massage facility within its jurisdictional boundaries to adopt a local process that ensures that the required background checks are conducted; Requires such a local process to also require, as a condition for a person remaining as or becoming a massage facility operator, owner, or employee, that: Every current operator, owner, and employee submit to a background check on or before the earlier of October 1, 2025, or any other date specified in the local process; and Every prospective operator or owner to submit to a background check at least 30 days before being granted a license to operate the massage facility or assuming an ownership interest in a massage facility; Prohibits a person from being a massage facility owner if the person either has not submitted to a required background check or has either: Been convicted of or entered an accepted plea of nolo contendere for a felony or misdemeanor of solicitation of a prostitute, a human trafficking offense, or money laundering; or Is registered as a sex offender or is required by law to register as a sex offender; Prohibits a massage facility operator or owner from employing at a massage facility a person who has not submitted to a required background check; Authorizes an operator or owner to employ at a massage facility a person who has been convicted of or entered an accepted plea of nolo contendere for a felony or misdemeanor of solicitation of a prostitute, a human trafficking offense, or money laundering, or who is registered as a sex offender or is required by law to register as a sex offender, if the operator or owner believes that the person does not pose a threat to customers or employees of the massage facility; Authorizes the local licensing authority for a local government that has established massage facility business licensure requirements to suspend or revoke the license of any massage facility that has an owner or an employee who is prohibited from being a massage facility owner or employee; Requires a county and a municipality within the county to consult with each other when developing, as is still authorized but not required, a resolution or ordinance to establish business licensure requirements for massage facilities or regulate and prohibit unlawful activities to prevent the operation of illicit massage businesses that engage in human trafficking-related offenses, and, by mutual agreement between a county and a municipality within the county, allows a municipality to elect to have a county's resolution or ordinance apply to massage facilities operating within the jurisdictional boundaries of the municipality in lieu of adopting its own ordinance or resolution; and Because a massage therapist is required by current law to submit to a background check to obtain a license to practice massage therapy, exempts a licensed massage therapist from the act's background check requirement. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/11/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/2/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/23/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/24/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/25/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/26/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/3/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2024 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/23/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/23/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/23/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1437Amend Prohibit Flat Fees for Defending Indigent Clients M. Weissman (D) | M. Duran (D) / R. Fields (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) Beginning July 1, 2025, the act requires a municipality that prosecutes an act of domestic violence and that contracts directly with one or more defense attorneys to provide counsel to indigent defendants to ensure that the municipality's contract does not use a fixed or flat-fee payment structure for indigent defense services. The act requires the municipal court to instead use the same payment structure and rates that are paid by the state of Colorado to attorneys or other interdisciplinary team members under contract with the office of alternate defense counsel and consistent with chief justice directive 04-04. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/1/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/17/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/22/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/23/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/28/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/28/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/28/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1447Monitor Transit Reform W. Lindstedt (D) | M. Froelich (D) / F. Winter (D) The length of the bill summary for this bill requires it to be published on a separate page here: https://leg.colorado.gov/hb24-1447-bill-summary (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  4/9/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/30/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/2/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/3/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Appropriations

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1454Support Grace Period Noncompliance Digital Accessibility D. Ortiz (D) | R. Pugliese (R) / P. Lundeen (R) Current law requires state agencies and public entities to comply with digital accessibility standards on or before July 1, 2024. The act provides a one-year extension to July 1, 2025, of immunity from liability for failure to comply with the digital accessibility standards for an agency that demonstrates good faith efforts toward compliance or toward resolution of any complaint of noncompliance. To be eligible for the extension, the act requires the agency to post quarterly reports on progress and create a process for redress for inaccessible digital products. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 24, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/15/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
4/22/2024 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/25/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2024 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/1/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/4/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/5/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/23/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/23/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/23/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/24/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB24-1455Amend Effective Date 23rd Judicial District M. Weissman (D) | L. Frizell (R) / R. Fields (D) | B. Gardner (R) The act changes the effective date of the creation of the new twenty-third judicial district from January 7, 2025, to January 14, 2025, to coincide with the date that the district attorney of that district will be sworn in. To facilitate the creation of the new judicial district, the act authorizes the operations and employees of the eighteenth judicial district to be divided into 2 distinct units. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 24, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/15/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/23/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/25/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/26/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/23/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/23/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/23/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/24/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-004Support County Veterans Service Offices Administration R. Pelton (R) | R. Fields (D) / L. Frizell (R) | W. Lindstedt (D) Under current law, the division of veterans affairs (division) in the department of military and veterans affairs has a duty to supervise county veterans service offices (county offices). The act changes the division's duty to instead monitor county offices. The act changes procedures for the division's payment to counties for the performance of certain veterans services, and requires the division to convene a working group that includes county commissioners to develop a method for distributing state-funded payments. Under current law, the board of county commissioners (board) appoints all veterans service officers and staff for county offices. The board is required to appoint a county veterans service officer, and may authorize the appointed county veterans service officer to hire additional county veterans service officers and staff as the board finds necessary. Under current law, a county veterans service officer is required to have certain military qualifications. The act requires only an appointed county veterans service officer to have these military qualifications. The act adds state certification and United States department of veterans affairs accreditation requirements in order to be a county veterans service officer and for a county veterans service officer to be eligible to serve as a claimant's representative and to assist a veteran claimant with the preparation, presentation, or prosecution of a claim for a United States department of veterans affairs benefit. APPROVED by Governor March 22, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
1/25/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
1/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
1/31/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/2/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
2/29/2024 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/1/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/4/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/5/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
3/6/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
3/11/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
3/11/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
3/12/2024 Sent to the Governor
3/22/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-005Amend Prohibit Landscaping Practices for Water Conservation D. Roberts (D) | C. Simpson (R) / K. McCormick (D) | B. McLachlan (D) On and after January 1, 2026, the act prohibits local governments from allowing the installation, planting, or placement of nonfunctional turf, artificial turf, or invasive plant species on commercial, institutional, or industrial property, common interest community property, or a street right-of-way, parking lot, median, or transportation corridor. The act also prohibits the department of personnel from allowing the installation, planting, or placement of nonfunctional turf, artificial turf, or invasive plant species as part of a project for the construction or renovation of a state facility, which project design commences on or after January 1, 2025. Artificial turf on athletic fields of play is exempted from the prohibitions. APPROVED by Governor March 15, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
1/25/2024 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
1/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
1/31/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/2/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Agriculture, Water & Natural Resources
2/26/2024 House Committee on Agriculture, Water & Natural Resources Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/28/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
2/29/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/1/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
3/11/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
3/11/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
3/12/2024 Sent to the Governor
3/15/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-008Support Kinship Foster Care Homes R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) / R. Pugliese (R) | M. Young (D) The act states that a court shall not delay permanency planning for a child or youth for purposes of maintaining financial support for a kinship foster care home or a non-certified kinship foster care home, unless there are exceptional circumstances as approved by the court. Prior to transferring temporary legal custody of a child or youth to a relative or kin, the court shall make findings that the relative or kin was advised regarding the differences between kinship foster care and non-certified kinship care, including, but not limited to, financial assistance, custody requirements, and long-term financial support options. The act allows the state department of human services (state department) to promulgate rules to modify the requirements for kinship foster care homes, including training topics for kinship foster care certification. Emergency financial assistance for a kinship foster care home is expanded to include goods needed for the child's basic care, including beds, clothing, and transportation costs, and limited rental or housing assistance not to exceed a 60-day subsidy. The act clarifies the definitions regarding foster care homes, kinship foster care homes (kinship home), and non-certified kinship foster care homes (non-certified kinship home). A kinship home is a home that has been certified by a county department of human or social services (county department) a child placement agency to provide 24-hour care for relatives or kin who are less than 21 years of age. A kinship home is eligible for the same foster care reimbursement, assistance, and other supports as foster care homes. "Kinship foster care home" does not include a non-certified kinship home. A non-certified kinship home means a relative or kin who has a significant relationship with the child or youth and who has either chosen not to pursue the certification process or who has not met the certification requirements for a kinship home. The act formally establishes the process by which a kinship home may apply for certification from a county department or child placement agency. A county department or child placement agency, upon the completion of the required background checks, may issue a one-time provisional certificate for a period of 6 months to an applicant at a specific location who is requesting provisional certification, if requested by the applicant. If the applicant completes the required background checks, the county department or child placement agency shall make payment beginning with the completion of the fingerprint background check. The county department or child placement agency shall complete the certification process within the timelines promulgated by rule of the state board of human services. The applicant has the right to appeal any denial of certification. The state department, a county department, or a child placement agency has the right to revoke a kinship home's certification for cause. Prior to issuing a certificate or subsequent certificate to an applicant to operate a kinship home, a county department or a child placement agency shall conduct a fingerprint-based criminal history record check (fingerprint check) through the Colorado bureau of investigation. The applicant shall pay, unless otherwise paid by a county department, the costs associated with the fingerprint check to the Colorado bureau of investigation. The county department or child placement agency to which the kinship home applied for certification shall extend the provisional certification by an additional 60 days if the applicant can demonstrate that the applicant did not cause the delay in completing all the requirements for certification. A kinship home may opt out of the provisional certification process and remain eligible for supports through sources other than foster care maintenance. Kinship foster care homes are eligible for financial reimbursement and supports at the same rate as foster care homes, as established in rules promulgated by the state board of human services. Non-certified kinship care homes are eligible for financial assistance and supports at 30% of the foster care rate, increasing to 50% beginning in the 2026-27 state fiscal year, based on the age of the child or youth receiving care. The state department shall reimburse the county departments 90% of the amounts expended by county departments for kinship foster care and non-certified kinship care daily rates to support financial assistance. The kinship foster care rate and non-certified kinship care rate are exempt from the state close-out process. The state department shall collaborate with the department of education, the department of public health and environment, and the department of health care policy and financing to develop an interagency resource. The state department shall prominently post the resource on the state department's website. The act directs the state department and the judicial department to collect data on the number of children who are placed with certified and non-certified kin through a dependency and neglect case, regardless of who has custody of the child or youth. The state department shall make the data available on its website on or before October 1, 2025. On or before October 1, 2025, the state department shall study and report to the general assembly the feasibility of using federal funds, including, but not limited to, federal IV-B, IV-E, or TANF funds, or other grant funding to provide or reimburse for the provision of brief legal services or legal representation of relative and kin caregivers. On or before August 1, 2025, and every August 1 thereafter until August 1, 2030, the state department shall submit a report to the joint budget committee on the implementation of non-certified kinship care homes, the impacts to the number of placements with kinship foster care homes, and the impacts to the number of placements with county departments in their ability to support providers. The state department shall submit data provided by county departments as a supplement to the report. The act makes conforming amendments to align statutory sections related to foster care homes with kinship homes. The act makes the following appropriations to the department of human services for the 2024-25 state fiscal year: $190,672 from the general fund for use by the administration and finance division; $5,516,580 from the Colorado long-term works reserve for use by the office of children, youth, and families for child welfare services; and $1,221,710 from local funds for use by the office of children, youth, and families for child welfare services. The act anticipates that the department of human services will receive $6,459,409 in federal funds to be used by the office of children, youth, and families for child welfare services. The act appropriates $55,748 to the department of public safety for the 2024-25 state fiscal year for use by the biometric identification and records unit. APPROVED by Governor May 30, 2024 EFFECTIVE September 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/1/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Finance
2/8/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/15/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/20/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/25/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/10/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Finance
4/18/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/1/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/3/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/30/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-022Support Regulate Flavored Tobacco Products K. Mullica (D) / K. Brown (D) | E. Velasco (D)  The bill allows a board of county commissioners to adopt an ordinance or resolution to: Regulate the distribution of cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products; and Prohibit the distribution or retail sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products, including prohibiting the sale of any or all flavored cigarettes, flavored tobacco products, or flavored nicotine products. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
2/8/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
2/13/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/16/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
2/16/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/20/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/27/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
3/7/2024 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-025Support Update Local Government Sales & UseTax Collection J. Bridges (D) | K. Van Winkle (R) / C. Kipp (D) | R. Taggart (R) Under current law, the department of revenue (department) administers, collects, and enforces the local sales or use tax that a statutory local government or a special district imposes and, if requested, administers, collects, and enforces any such tax that a home rule jurisdiction imposes. The statutes that govern the administration, collection, and enforcement of these local sales or use taxes are located in multiple titles of the Colorado Revised Statutes. The act revises, modernizes, and harmonizes the separate statutes that govern the state administration of local sales or use tax by creating new parts 2 and 3 in article 2 of title 29. In general, the act makes clear that the department collects, administers, and enforces a local government sales or use tax in the same manner as it collects, administers, and enforces the state sales tax. The act: Requires a statutory local government, special district, or requesting home rule jurisdiction that imposes a new sales or use tax, makes a change to its existing sales or use tax, or changes its geographical boundaries by ordinance, resolution, or election to provide the department written notice within specified deadlines and establishes the applicability dates for such events; Requires each statutory local government, special district, and requesting home rule jurisdiction to designate one or more liaisons to coordinate with the department regarding the collection of its sales or use tax; Establishes a dispute resolution process when the local sales or use tax that is administered, collected, and enforced by the department is paid erroneously to the state or to the wrong statutory local government, special district, or home rule jurisdiction; Makes clear that a vendor who uses the department's geographic information system (GIS) database to determine the jurisdictions to which statutory local government, special district, or requesting home rule jurisdiction tax is owed is held harmless for any tax, charge, or fee liability that would otherwise be due solely as a result of an error or omission in the GIS database data; Clarifies that a statutory local government, special district, or requesting home rule jurisdiction may allow a retailer that collects and remits its sales or use tax to retain a percentage of the amount remitted to cover the vendors' expenses in collecting and remitting the statutory local government, special district, or requesting home rule jurisdiction's sales or use tax, but specifies that the statutory local government, special district, or requesting home rule jurisdiction may not impose a limit on the amount retained; Modifies the relief available under the provisions for local dispute resolution for sales or use taxes asserted by the local government to reflect the availability of the department's GIS database for accurately sourcing sales; and Makes conforming amendments for the collection, administration, enforcement, and distribution of statutory local government, special district, and requesting home rule jurisdiction sales or use taxes. APPROVED by Governor May 1, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
1/30/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
2/15/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
2/21/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/21/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
2/22/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/22/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/4/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/5/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/8/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/19/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/22/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/22/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/1/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-033Monitor Lodging Property Tax Treatment C. Hansen (D) / M. Weissman (D)  Legislative Oversight Committee Concerning Tax Policy. The bill establishes that, for property tax years commencing on or after January 1, 2026, a short-term rental unit, which is an improvement that is designated and used as a place of residency by a person, family, or families, but that is also leased for overnight lodging for less than 30 consecutive days in exchange for a monetary payment (short-term stay) and is not a primary residence, and the land upon which the improvement is located, may be classified as either residential real property or lodging property. If, during the previous property tax year, a short-term rental unit was leased for short-term stays for more than 90 days, then it is classified as lodging property. Otherwise, it is classified as residential real property. Actual value for a short-term rental unit that is classified as lodging property is to be determined solely by application of the market approach to appraisal. The bill also specifies, with an exception for a property that qualifies as a bed and breakfast, that a building designed for use predominantly as a place of residency by a person, a family, or families but that is actually used, or available for use, to provide short-term stays only is a hotel and motel. For purposes of applying the classification of either residential or lodging to a short-term rental unit, annually, the assessor is required to send notice to owners of short-term rental units of the number of days during the prior property tax year that the assessor has determined the property was leased for short-term stays. An owner must sign and return the notice and, if the owner disputes the number of days the property was leased for short-term stays, the owner must provide evidence demonstrating a different number of days the property was leased for short-term stays. Additionally, the property tax administrator is required to establish and administer a pilot program to develop a statewide database and uniform reporting system to track short-term rental units. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/16/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-040Support State Funding for Senior Services J. Danielson (D) | J. Ginal (D) / J. Willford (D) | M. Young (D) No later than August 2024, and each August every 3 years thereafter, the act requires the department of human services (department), the office of state planning and budgeting, and representatives from area agencies on aging to review the adequacy of the appropriation for senior services for the prior 3 fiscal years to address the needs of senior citizens who request services pursuant to the "Older Coloradans' Act". The department is required to report the findings of the adequacy review during its "SMART Act" hearing. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 24, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
1/25/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/30/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/1/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
5/2/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/5/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/24/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-043Amend Authorizing Direct-to-Consumer Sales of Raw Milk D. Roberts (D) | B. Pelton (R) / J. McCluskie (D)  Water Resources and Agriculture Review Committee. The bill authorizes a raw milk producer (producer) that registers with the department of public health and environment (department) to engage in direct-to-consumer sales of raw milk in the state if the producer complies with certain labeling, storage, handling, and transportation requirements. The direct-to-consumer sales may take place at the location where the raw milk is produced, at the consumer's residence, or at a farmers' market or roadside market. The bill authorizes the department of agriculture to: Adopt rules related to the storage, handling, and transportation of raw milk intended for sale directly to consumers; Inspect producers' raw milk and operations; Enforce against a violation in court or by imposition of a civil penalty.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/12/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
1/18/2024 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/23/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Lost - No Amendments
4/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/09/2024 - No Amendments

Fiscal Note 

SB24-050Amend Colorado Workforce Demonstration Grants Pilot Program T. Exum (D)  The bill creates the Colorado workforce demonstration grants pilot program (pilot program) in the office of economic development (office) to provide grants to eligible workforce training providers in order to facilitate workforce training for eligible participants. The office administers the pilot program and awards grants from the Colorado workforce demonstration grants pilot program cash fund (fund), which is created in the bill. In awarding grants, the office must: Give first priority to eligible workforce training providers that implement a proven program or practice; Give second priority to eligible workforce training providers that implement an evidence-informed program or practice; and Allocate one-third of the money appropriated to the fund to eligible workforce training providers that are qualified intermediaries, so long as at least one eligible workforce training provider that is a qualified intermediary selected to participate includes in its application a plan to conduct an evaluation that, once completed, will demonstrate that the qualified intermediary is offering a proven program or practice. An eligible workforce training provider that receives a grant from the pilot program must report to the office certain information concerning the proven programs or practices and the evidence-informed programs or practices that it provides or facilitates with the grant money. The office must conduct an evaluation of long-term wage outcomes for eligible participants served by eligible workforce training providers under the pilot program. The evaluation must anonymize personal data, aggregate data by each eligible workforce training provider, and be consolidated into a single annual report. The office must submit an annual summarized report to the legislative subject matter committees concerned with labor and employment. The pilot program is repealed, effective July 1, 2029. Any unexpended and unencumbered money remaining in the fund is transferred to the general fund. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/12/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
2/1/2024 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Appropriations

Fiscal Note 

SB24-053Support Racial Equity Study J. Coleman (D) / L. Herod (D) | N. Ricks (D) The act establishes the Black Coloradan racial equity commission (commission) in the legislative department to conduct a study to determine, and make recommendations related to, any historical and ongoing effects of slavery and subsequent systemic racism on Black Coloradans that may be attributed to Colorado state practices, systems, and policies. The study includes historical research conducted by the state historical society (society), commonly known as history Colorado, and an economic analysis conducted by a third party. The society may enter into an agreement with a third-party entity to conduct all or parts of the historical research. The society shall conduct at least 2 community engagement sessions for members of the public to provide input to the society. The society shall provide the commission with quarterly updates about the status of its research. The society is required to submit a report to the commission with the results of its research and any recommendations. The commission shall enter into an agreement with a third party to conduct an economic analysis of the financial impact of systemic racism on historically impacted Black Coloradans utilizing the findings of the society's historical research. The third party shall deliver the results of its economic analysis to the commission. At the conclusion of the study, the commission shall submit a report to the general assembly and the governor about the study and make the report available on a publicly accessible webpage of the general assembly's website. The report must include a description of the study's goals, the results of the historical research and economic analysis, and the commission's recommendations. After the commission submits the report, the commission shall work with any parties necessary to implement the recommendations in the report. The study is contingent upon the commission receiving $785,000 of gifts, grants, or donations for the purpose of conducting the study. The act creates the Black Coloradan racial equity study cash fund to accept the gifts, grants, or donations received for the study. The money in the cash fund is continuously appropriated to legislative council for use by the commission and to the society for conducting the historical research. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/17/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
2/1/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Finance
2/8/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/15/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/19/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/20/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/25/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
4/1/2024 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Unamended to Finance
4/15/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/19/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Legislative Council
4/19/2024 House Committee on Refer Unamended to Legislative Council
4/26/2024 House Committee on Legislative Council Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/30/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/2/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
6/4/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-059Support Children's Behavioral Health Statewide System of Care B. Kirkmeyer (R) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) / M. Duran (D) | R. Pugliese (R)  Colorado's Child Welfare System Interim Study Committee. The bill requires the behavioral health administration (BHA), in partnership with the office of children, youth, and families in the department of human services; the department of health care policy and financing; the division of insurance in the department of regulatory agencies; and the department of public health and environment, to develop, establish, and maintain a comprehensive children's behavioral health statewide system of care (system of care). The system of care will serve as the single point of access to address the behavioral health needs of children and youth in Colorado, regardless of payer, insurance, and income. The system of care shall serve children and youth up to twenty-one years of age who have mental health disorders, substance use disorders, co-occurring behavioral health disorders, or intellectual and developmental disabilities. The system of care must include, at a minimum, a statewide behavioral health standardized screening and assessment, trauma-informed mobile crisis response and stabilization services for children and youth, tiered care coordination for moderate and intensive levels of need, parent and youth peer support, intensive in-home and community-based services, and respite services. The bill establishes the office of the children's behavioral health statewide system of care (office) in the BHA. The office is the primary governance entity and is responsible for convening all relevant state agencies involved in the system of care, including, but not limited to, the department of human services office of children, youth, and families, the division of child welfare, and the division of youth services; the department of health care policy and financing; the division of insurance in the department of regulatory agencies; and the department of public health and environment. The office will be directed by the deputy commissioner of the office. The bill requires the office to create and convene, on or before November 1, 2024, a leadership team responsible for decision-making and oversight. The leadership team is required to provide a report to the house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services committee and the senate health and human services committee, or their successor committees, on or before July 1, 2027. The office is required to create and convene, on or before January 15, 2025, an implementation team that shall create an implementation plan for the system of care. The implementation plan must receive an annual minimum appropriation of $10 million and include the creation of a capacity-building center, which shall develop, implement, and fund, within available appropriations, the following: A student loan forgiveness program for students in behavioral health disciplines who make a 3- to 5-year commitment to work in shortage areas in the system of care; Paid internships and clinical rotations in the system of care and a description of multiple options for payment; Revisions to graduate medical education programs at Colorado institutions of higher education to support internships, residencies, fellowships, and student programs in child and youth behavioral health; A financial aid program for youth transitioning out of foster care who wish to pursue a career in children and youth behavioral health, developed in partnership with Colorado institutions of higher education and community colleges; and An expansion of current BHA efforts related to behavioral health apprenticeships, internships, stipends, and pre-licensure workforce support specific to service children, youth, and families. On or before January 15, 2025, the office is required to create an advisory council, composed of, at a minimum, family and youth providers, local partners, county departments of human and social services, county commissioners, juvenile justice agencies, families or individuals with lived experience using children's or youths' behavioral health services, consumer advocacy organizations, and university partners. The BHA shall develop a state-level process to monitor, report on, and promptly resolve complaints, grievances, and appeals, including recipient rights issues. The process must be available to providers, clients, case management entities, and anyone else working with the children and youth in the system of care. The bill requires the leadership team to begin, or contract for, on or before January 1, 2025, a cost and utilization analysis of the populations of children and youth who are included in the system of care. On or before July 1, 2025, the department of health care policy and financing, in consultation with the office, is required to establish standard and uniform medical necessity criteria for all system of care services. The department of health care policy and financing is required to set standard rate and utilization floors for all system of care services across all managed care entities. On or before July 1, 2025, the bill requires the department of health care policy and financing to establish a standard statewide medicaid fee schedule or rate frame for behavioral health services for children and youth and incorporate the fee schedule and rate frame into the contracts with managed care entities and behavioral health administrative services organizations. The fee schedule or rate frame must increase rates and incorporate enhanced rates or quality bonuses for evidence-based practices and extended weekday and weekend clinic hours and allow maximum flexibility for use of telehealth to expand access. The bill requires that each managed care entity or behavioral health administrative services organization contract with or have single-use agreements with every qualified residential treatment facility or psychiatric residential treatment facility that is licensed in Colorado. The office, advised by state and county partners, providers, and racially, ethnically, culturally, and geographically diverse family and youth representatives, is required to develop and establish a data and quality team. The data team shall track and report annually on key child welfare factors. The bill requires the BHA, advised by the office, to establish or procure a capacity-building center. The capacity-building center shall, at a minimum: Train, coach, and certify providers of the array of services offered through the system of care; Provide training, coaching, and certification related to the use of behavioral health screening and assessment tools to support a uniform assessment process and training in trauma-informed care to staff at relevant state agencies; Work with rural health clinics and federally qualified health centers to expand their capacity to provide behavioral health services to children and youth; Offer training and other strategies to expand the number of behavioral health providers in rural and other underserved communities; and Utilize data and reports to target its investment to build capacity in regions identified as lacking capacity. The bill requires the BHA to develop a website to provide regularly updated information to families, youth, providers, staff, system partners, and others regarding the goals, principles, activities, progress, and timelines for the system of care. The website must include key performance dashboard indicators; changes in access by the child welfare population; changes in access disparities between racial, ethnic, and regional groups; and changes in access to intensive- and moderate-care coordination with high-fidelity wraparound. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/17/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/22/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/19/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/23/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/24/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
5/2/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-106Monitor Right to Remedy Construction Defects R. Zenzinger (D) | J. Coleman (D) / S. Bird (D)  In the "Construction Defect Action Reform Act" (act), Colorado law establishes procedures for bringing a lawsuit for a construction defect (claim). Section 2 Section 4 of the bill clarifies that a person that has had a claim brought on the person's behalf is also considered a claimant, and therefore, the act applies to the person for whom the claim is brought. Sections 3 and 6 create a right for a construction professional to remedy a claim made against the construction professional by doing remedial work or hiring another construction professional to perform the work. The following applies to the remedy: The construction professional must notify the claimant and diligently make sure the remedial work is performed; and Upon completion, the claimant is deemed to have settled and released the claim, and the claimant is limited to claims regarding improper performance of the remedial work. Currently, a claim may be held in abeyance if the parties have agreed to mediation. Section 3 also adds other forms of alternative dispute resolution for which the claim would be held in abeyance. Alternative dispute resolution is binding. If a settlement offer of a payment is made and accepted in a claim, the payment constitutes a settlement of the claim and the cause of action is deemed to have been released, and an offer of settlement is not admissible in any subsequent action or legal proceeding unless the proceeding is to enforce the settlement. To bring a claim or related action, section 4 section 2 requires a unit owners' association (association) to obtain the written consent of at least two-thirds 60% of the actual owners of the units in the common interest community. The consent must contain the currently required notices must be signed by each consenting owner, and must have certain attestations. Under the act, a claimant is barred from seeking damages for failing to comply with building codes or industry standards unless the failure results in: Actual damage to real or personal property; Actual loss of the use of real or personal property; Bodily injury or wrongful death; or A risk of bodily injury or death to, or a threat to the life, health, or safety of, the occupants. Section 5 requires the actual property damage to be the result of a building code violation and requires the risk of injury or death or the threat to life, health, or safety to be imminent and unreasonable. Section 3 changes the standard concerning the risk of bodily injury or death to a verifiable danger to the occupants and adds another option to bring a claim if the defect results in a failure or lack of capacity of a building component to perform the intended purpose of the building component. Under current law, an association may institute, defend, or intervene in litigation or administrative proceedings in its own name on behalf of itself or 2 or more unit owners on matters affecting a common interest community. For a construction defect matter to affect a common interest community, section 7 requires that the matter concern real estate that is owned by the association or by all members of the association. Section 7 also establishes that, when an association makes a claim or takes legal action on behalf of unit owners when the matter does not concern real estate owned by the association: The association and each claim are subject to each defense, limitation, claim procedure, and alternative dispute resolution procedure that each unit owner would be subject to if the unit owner had brought the claim; and The association has a fiduciary duty to act in the best interest of each unit owner. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  2/5/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
3/21/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/25/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/01/24 - No Amendments
4/1/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/08/2024 - No Amendments
4/10/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/11/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/1/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
5/3/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-125Support Interstate Compact for the Placement of Children B. Pelton (R) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) / G. Evans (R) | A. Boesenecker (D) The act enacts the "Interstate Compact on Placement of Children" (compact). The purpose of the compact is to: Provide a process through which children subject to this compact are placed in safe and suitable homes in a timely manner; Facilitate ongoing supervision of a placement, the delivery of services, and communication between the states; Provide operating procedures that will ensure that children are placed in safe and suitable homes in a timely manner; Provide for promulgation and enforcement of administrative rules implementing the compact and regulating the covered activities of the member states; Provide for uniform data collection and information sharing between member states; Promote coordination between the compact, the interstate compact for juveniles, the interstate compact on adoption and medical assistance, and other compacts affecting the placement of children and provision of services to children otherwise subject to this compact; Provide for a state's continuing legal jurisdiction and responsibility for placement and care of a child that it would have had if the placement were intrastate; and Provide for the promulgation of guidelines, in collaboration with Indian tribes, for interstate cases involving Indian children as is or may be permitted by federal law. After the act takes effect, and subject to available appropriations, the executive director of the department of human services (executive director) shall convene a working group to review the proposal for enactment of the revised interstate compact on placement of children, and conclude one year later unless amended. The working group shall review and make recommendations, according to a time frame determined by the working group, to Colorado's commissioner to the compact on the following issues: Evaluating the current compact process for children and families; Determining the status of Colorado's implementation of the national electronic interstate compact enterprise requirements and what effect the implementation of these requirements may have on Colorado; Improving the use of cross-border agreements; Identifying any barriers to placing children in residential treatment facilities out of state and options for addressing barriers within existing law; Identifying and prioritizing any alternative efforts being made to address interstate placement issues at the national level; and Identifying language and processes to improve interstate placements. The compact takes effect after the executive director provides notice to the revisor of statutes that the thirty-fifth state has enacted the compact. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/6/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/7/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/12/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/12/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/13/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/13/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/16/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/19/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/20/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/22/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/23/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/3/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/3/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/3/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/24/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-131Support Prohibiting Carrying Firearms in Sensitive Spaces S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | C. Kolker (D) / K. Brown (D) | M. Lindsay (D) The act prohibits a person from knowingly carrying a firearm, both openly and concealed, in the following government buildings, including their adjacent parking areas: State legislative buildings, including buildings at which the offices of elected members are located; A building of a local government's governing body, including buildings at which the offices of elected members or the chief executive officer of a local government are located (local government buildings); and A courthouse or other building used for court proceedings. Unlawful carrying of a firearm in a government building is a class 1 misdemeanor. The act includes exceptions for law enforcement officers, members of the United States armed forces or Colorado National Guard, security personnel, persons carrying as part of the lawful and common practices of a legal proceeding, and persons who hold a permit to carry a concealed handgun (concealed carry permit) who are carrying a concealed handgun in an adjacent parking area. The act permits a local government to enact a law permitting carrying at a local government building included in the act. Members of the general assembly are exempt from the prohibition on carrying in a state legislative building until January 5, 2025. The act prohibits a person from knowingly carrying a firearm, both openly and concealed, on the property of a child care center, other than a family child care home, that is licensed by the department of early childhood or is exempt from licensing pursuant to state law, and that operates with stated educational purposes (licensed child care center); public or private elementary, middle, junior high, high, or vocational school; or any public or private college, university, or seminary (higher education institution), with exceptions. A violation is a class 1 misdemeanor. The act maintains exceptions in existing law for carrying a firearm on the property of a public elementary, middle, junior high, or high school and adds exceptions for concealed carry permit holders carrying in the parking area of a licensed child care center or higher education institution; security personnel at a licensed child care center or higher education institution; and for a licensed child care center that is on the same property as another building or improvement, carrying a firearm in an area that is not designated as a licensed child care center. Existing law prohibits openly carrying a firearm within any polling location or central count facility, or within 100 feet of a ballot drop box or any building in which a polling location or central count facility is located, while an election or any related ongoing election administration activity is in progress. The act prohibits carrying a firearm in any manner at those locations. APPROVED by Governor May 31, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/7/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
3/20/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
3/27/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/2/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/3/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/5/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/17/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/19/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/22/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/29/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Adhere
4/30/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/6/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/7/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/7/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/31/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-136Amend Uniform Guardianship & Conservatorship Act B. Gardner (R) | J. Ginal (D) / M. Young (D) | M. Soper (R)  Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill repeals the "Uniform Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Act" and enacts the "Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship, and Other Protective Arrangements Act", drafted by the uniform law commission. The bill provides guidance for guardians and conservators and clarifies how appointees must make decisions on behalf of a person under guardianship or conservatorship. The bill encourages the use of protective arrangements and less restrictive alternatives instead of conservatorship or guardianship if a person's needs can be met with support services and technology. The bill expands the procedural rights for respondents to ensure that guardianships and conservatorships are only imposed when necessary. The bill provides for expanded monitoring of guardians and conservators to ensure compliance with fiduciary duties and prevent exploitation. The bill provides for visitation and communication rights for individuals subject to guardianship or conservatorship. This includes a limitation on a guardian's ability to prevent communication, visitation, or interactions between a person subject to guardianship and a third party. The bill provides for protections to prevent exploitation of vulnerable individuals by allowing the court to restrict access to the respondent or the respondent's property by a specified person without imposing a guardianship or conservatorship. The bill prohibits courts from establishing full guardianship or conservatorship if a limited guardianship or conservatorship would meet the respondent's needs, requires a petitioner seeking full guardianship or conservatorship to provide support to justify full guardianship or conservatorship, and requires courts to provide findings to support the imposition of full guardianship or conservatorship. The bill updates provisions concerning minors subject to guardianship and provides for involvement of a minor in decisions that involve the minor. The bill provides guidance for property management for individuals subject to guardianship. The bill contains model forms for petitioners and respondents to use when filing petitions and notice with the court. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  2/7/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
3/27/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Finance
4/9/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/1/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/1/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/2/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
5/4/2024 House Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-139Monitor Creation of 911 Services Enterprise J. Gonzales (D) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | W. Lindstedt (D) The act creates the 911 services enterprise in the department of regulatory agencies (enterprise). The enterprise is authorized to impose a fee on service users (fee). A service user is a person who is provided a 911 access connection in the state. The fee is set annually by the enterprise and, together with the 911 surcharge that the public utilities commission (commission) imposes on service users for the benefit of meeting the needs of governing bodies to pay for basic emergency service and provide emergency telephone service (911 surcharge) and must not exceed $0.50 per month per 911 access connection. The fee is collected in the same manner as the 911 surcharge. Revenue from the fee will fund expenses and costs related to the provision of 911 services, including: Training initiatives and programs and public education campaigns for the public as determined by individual governing bodies or public safety answering points (PSAPs) throughout the state; Public education campaigns; Cybersecurity support; GIS programs; Grant programs for the benefit of governing bodies and PSAPs; Providing matching money for federal, state, or private grants related to 911 services or emergency notification services; Any other items related to a benefit for governing bodies and PSAPs for 911 services across the state as proposed by a group of such entities or by statewide associations representing Colorado 911 stakeholders; and Administrative expenses of the enterprise. The act also creates the 911 services enterprise cash fund, adds a requirement for the commission to include in its "state of 911" annual report the activity of the enterprise including its use of its revenue, and makes several technical updates to the statutes concerning the 911 surcharge and the commission's "state of 911" report. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $107,695 from the general fund to the department of regulatory agencies and reappropriates $38,406 of that appropriation to the department of law to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor May 31, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/7/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
3/5/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
4/2/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/16/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/19/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/19/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/25/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/7/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/7/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/8/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/13/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/13/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/31/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-159Monitor Mod to Energy & Carbon Management Processes S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | K. Priola (D) / A. Boesenecker (D) | J. Marvin (D)  On or before July 1, 2027, section 2 of the bill requires the energy and carbon management commission (commission) to adopt rules (permitting rules) to cease issuing new oil and gas permits (permits) before January 1, 2030, which rules must include certain reductions in the total number of oil and gas wells covered by new permits issued in 2028 and 2029. Section 2 also requires the commission to include as a condition in any permit issued after July 1, 2024, that certain operations must commence on or before December 31, 2032, as to each oil and gas well included in the permit. If the commission determines that mitigation of adverse environmental impacts is necessary as a result of oil and gas operations, current law requires the commission to issue an order requiring a responsible party to perform the mitigation. If the responsible party refuses to perform the mitigation or is identified after the state provides funds for the mitigation, the commission must sue the responsible party to recover the costs of the mitigation. Section 3 changes current law by: Expanding mitigation to include mitigation of adverse environmental impacts as a result of any activity regulated by the commission; Adding a prior owner or operator to the definition of "responsible party"; and Allowing a current or prior owner or operator to be held jointly and severally liable for the costs of any mitigation. Section 4 requires the office of future of work to present recommendations as a result of the adoption of the permitting rules to the general assembly in January 2028.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/13/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
3/28/2024 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-165Monitor Air Quality Improvements K. Priola (D) | L. Cutter (D) / M. Rutinel (D) | L. Garcia (D)  On or before December 31, 2028, the bill requires the air quality control commission (AQCC) in the department of public health and environment (department) to adopt by rule certain emission standards and requirements for in-use, off-road, diesel-fueled fleets. On or before December 31, 2025, the AQCC must adopt rules for controlling emissions from facilities, buildings, structures, installations, or real property that generates mobile source activity that results in emissions of air pollutants (indirect source) within the 8-hour ozone Denver metro/north front range nonattainment area (covered nonattainment area). The rules must include emission reduction targets for indirect sources to achieve and a process for the division of administration (division) in the department to review alternative approaches proposed by an owner or operator of an indirect source. The commission may establish a fee for indirect sources within the covered nonattainment area to cover the division's costs in implementing the rules. The bill also defines "ozone season" as the period beginning May 1 and ending September 30 of each year (ozone season). Beginning in the 2025 ozone season, and in each ozone season thereafter, any oil and gas preproduction activity within the covered nonattainment area must pause for the duration of the ozone season. On or before June 30, 2024, and on or before each June 30 thereafter, an oil and gas operator in the state is required to submit an oil and natural gas annual emission inventory report (inventory report) to the division that includes, for the previous calendar year, the emissions of certain air pollutants from oil and gas operations under the control of the oil and gas operator. On or before October 1, 2024, and on or before each October 1 thereafter, the division, in coordination with the energy and carbon management commission (ECMC), must prepare a report regarding the inventory reports received by the division for the previous calendar year and certain other information. On or before November 30, 2024, and on or before each November 30 thereafter, for the ozone season of the subsequent year, an oil and gas operator that controls oil and gas operations in the covered nonattainment area must submit a report to the division estimating emissions of nitrogen oxides from the oil and gas operator's operations in the covered nonattainment area (estimates). For the 2025 ozone season, and for each ozone season thereafter, the ECMC, in consultation with the division, must develop an ozone season nitrogen oxides emission budget (budget) for the emissions of nitrogen oxides by oil and gas operations in the covered nonattainment area, which budget must set certain maximum average emission levels of nitrogen oxides by oil and gas operations. On or before February 1, 2025, and on or before each February 1 thereafter, the division must prepare a nitrogen oxides report regarding the estimates received by the division for use by the ECMC in determining if the total estimates received exceed the budget for the ozone season of the current year. Beginning in February 2025, and in each February thereafter, the ECMC, in consultation with the division, must act to limit emissions of nitrogen oxides from oil and gas operations in the covered nonattainment area in a manner that prevents an exceedance of the current year's budget. The bill also requires the department of transportation to establish vehicle miles traveled reduction targets for the covered nonattainment area and to develop policies and programs to assist applicable metropolitan planning organizations in meeting the targets. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/22/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
3/20/2024 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Finance
5/2/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB24-174Monitor Sustainable Affordable Housing Assistance B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Zenzinger (D) / S. Bird (D) | R. Pugliese (R) The act requires the executive director of the department of local affairs (director), no later than December 31, 2024, to develop reasonable methodologies for conducting statewide, regional, and local housing needs assessments and reasonable guidance for a local government to identify areas at elevated risk of displacement. The act requires the director, no later than November 30, 2027, and every 6 years thereafter, to conduct a statewide housing needs assessment that analyzes existing and future statewide housing needs and to publish a report, based on the statewide housing needs assessment and regional and local housing needs assessments accepted by the department, identifying current housing stock and estimating statewide housing needs. The act requires each local government, beginning December 31, 2026, to conduct and publish a local housing needs assessment. The act outlines the process for a local government conducting a local housing needs assessment and for determining when a local government is exempt from conducting a local housing needs assessment. The act requires local governments to submit local housing needs assessments to the department of local affairs (department), which shall publish those assessments on the department's website. Relatedly, the act allows a regional entity to conduct a regional housing needs assessment. If a regional entity conducts a regional housing needs assessment, the act requires the regional entity to submit the assessment both to each local government in the region and to the department, which shall publish those assessments on the department's website. A housing action plan is an advisory document that demonstrates a local government's commitment to address housing needs and that guides a local government in developing legislative actions, promoting regional coordination, and informing the public of the local government's efforts to address housing needs in the local government's jurisdiction. The act requires a local government with a population of either 5,000 or more or 1,000 or more if the local government either participated in a regional housing needs assessment or is a rural resort community to make a housing action plan no later than January 1, 2028, and every 6 years thereafter. The act identifies the specific elements that a housing action plan must include, explains how a local government may update a housing action plan, requires a local government to report its progress in implementing the plan to the department, and requires a local government to submit a housing action plan to the department, which shall publish each accepted housing action plan on the department's website. The act requires the director to develop, by no later than June 30, 2025: A standard affordability strategies directory; A long-term affordability strategies directory; and A displacement risk mitigation strategies directory. The act establishes the minimum required elements for all three directory types. The act also requires the director to submit a statewide strategic growth report to the general assembly no later than October 31, 2025, and develop and publish, in consultation with relevant state agencies, a natural land and agricultural interjurisdictional opportunities report no later than December 31, 2025. The act requires the division of local government (division) to provide technical assistance and guidance through a grant program, the provision of consultant services, or both to aid local governments in: Establishing regional entities; Creating local and regional housing needs assessments; Conducting a displacement risk analysis with a state-created tool; Identifying and implementing strategies included in the standard affordability strategies directory, long-term affordability strategies directory, or displacement risk mitigation strategies directory; Making and adopting a housing action plan; Enacting laws and policies that encourage the development of a range of housing types, including regulated affordable housing, or mitigate the impact of displacement; and Creating strategic growth elements in master plans. The act creates the continuously appropriated housing needs planning technical assistance fund to contain the money necessary for the division to provide this technical assistance and guidance. The act requires the state treasurer to transfer $10.5 million from the local government severance tax fund and $4.5 million from the local government mineral impact fund to this fund. Further, the act directs the division to serve as a clearing house for the benefit of local governments and regional entities in accomplishing the goals of the act. The division shall report on the assistance requested and provided under the act. On and after December 1, 2027, for any grant program conducted by the department, the Colorado energy office, the office of economic development, the department of transportation, the department of natural resources, the department of public health and environment, or the department of personnel and administration that awards grants to local governments for the primary purpose of supporting land use planning or housing, the act requires the awarding entity to prioritize awarding grants to a local government that: Has completed and filed a housing needs assessment; Has adopted a housing action plan that has been accepted by the department; Has reported progress to the department regarding the adoption of any strategies or changes to local laws identified in the housing action plan; and Is the subject of a master plan that includes a water supply element and a strategic growth element. In the case of a local government that is not required to do any of the above, the department is required to prioritize that local government in the same way that it prioritizes a local government that has done all of the above. On or before June 30, 2025, the act requires the department to designate criteria for the designation of a neighborhood center by a local government. If a local government designates a neighborhood center, the local government must submit a report to the department describing the neighborhood center. Furthermore, on or after December 31, 2026, the act requires certain grant programs to prioritize projects supporting or concerning neighborhood centers. The act modifies the requirements of both county and municipal master plans so that those master plans must include: A narrative description of the procedure used for the development and adoption of the master plan; No later than December 31, 2026, a water supply element; and No later than December 31, 2026, a strategic growth element. The water supply element in a county or municipal master plan must identify the general location and extent of an adequate and suitable supply of water, identify supplies and facilities sufficient to meet the needs of local infrastructure, and include water conservation policies. The strategic growth element in a master plan must include: A description of existing and potential policies and tools to promote strategic growth and prevent sprawl; An analysis of vacant and underutilized sites and the use of those sites for the development of housing; and An analysis of underdeveloped sites that are not adjacent to developed land for the use of those sites for residential use. The act requires both counties and municipalities to submit their master plan and any separately approved water or strategic growth element to the division for the division's review. The act prohibits a unit owners' association of a common interest community from, through any declaration or bylaw, rules, or regulation adopted or amended by an association on or after July 1, 2024, prohibiting or restricting the construction of accessory dwelling units or middle housing if the zoning laws of the association's local jurisdiction would otherwise allow such construction. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $583,864 is appropriated, from reappropriated funds received from the department of local affairs from the housing needs planning technical assistance fund, to the office of the governor for use by the office of information technology to provide information technology services for the department of local affairs for the implementation of the act. APPROVED by Governor May 30, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 30, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/5/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/9/2024 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/16/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/19/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
5/3/2024 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/6/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/7/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/8/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/31/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-200Support Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion in Child Welfare D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | J. Coleman (D) / J. Bacon (D) | J. Joseph (D) The act creates multiple ways to promote equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in Colorado's child welfare system. The state department of human services (department) is directed to work with county departments of human or social services to: Update the existing annual departmental EDI report using state data sources and national child welfare data clearinghouses; Identify necessary demographic or other data that is not currently collected in Colorado's child welfare case management system (management system) and determine recommendations for improving data collection statewide; Identify additional necessary demographic or other data about children, families, and people working in the child welfare that is not currently collected in the management system, the child welfare worker training system, or other components and data systems of the child welfare system, and, in collaboration with counties, determine internal or external processes and make recommendations for improving data collection and reporting statewide; Provide a report on the state's progress in addressing data collection and data entry challenges in the management system; Provide a report on the state's progress in training child welfare staff on demographic data collection; Report on the state's progress in training the child welfare workforce in reducing bias and in promoting EDI, and on progress in the training's alignment with current research and best practices in promoting EDI. The department shall strengthen EDI training for child welfare staff and management. The act requires the department to provide recommendations for training requirements for other child welfare agencies and to offer specific EDI training for mandatory reporters to address disparities in reporting in Colorado's child welfare system. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/8/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/18/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/23/2024 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/24/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/29/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/2/2024 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/5/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/6/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
6/6/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-210Monitor Modifications to Laws Regarding Elections S. Fenberg (D) | B. Pelton (R) / E. Sirota (D) The act modifies the "Uniform Election Code of 1992", (code) the law regarding initiatives and referendums, the "Fair Campaign Practices Act", the public official disclosure requirements of the "Colorado Sunshine Act of 1972", and other laws regarding elections. The act modifies the code as follows: Regarding elections generally, specifies that the county clerk and recorder, as the chief election official for the county, sets the operational hours of the clerk and recorder's office and specifies that the governing board of a county or city and county is not authorized to supervise the conduct of regular and special elections or to consult with election officials in regard to conducting elections and rendering decisions and interpretations under the code; Regarding the qualification and registration of electors, beginning January 1, 2025, changes the age at which an individual may preregister to vote from 16 to 15 years old; Regarding political party organization, specifies that when a state senatorial district or state representative district is comprised of one or more whole counties or of a part of one county and all or a part of one or more other counties, a state senatorial central committee or a state representative central committee consists of the elected precinct committee persons, as well as the chairpersons, vice-chairpersons, and secretary of the several party county central committees, who reside within the state senatorial district or the state representative district; Regarding access to the ballot by candidates, specifies that the law prohibiting a candidate who was defeated in a primary election from participating in a general election does not apply to a candidate for president of the United States; allows the governor to designate a location other than the office of the governor for the presidential electors to convene if the governor determines that it is not feasible to meet in the office of the governor; makes the deadlines for a candidate to file a petition in a congressional vacancy election consistent with other deadlines; makes the general timeline for circulating petitions to get on the ballot applicable to presidential electors for unaffiliated presidential candidates; beginning January 1, 2025, aligns the minor political party candidate petition calendar with the major political party candidate petition calendar; clarifies that an unaffiliated candidate for president of the United States is exempt from the requirement that a candidate be registered as unaffiliated with a political party in the statewide voter registration system prior to the general election; beginning January 1, 2025, requires a candidate or candidate committee, recall committee, or representative of a minority party petition to submit a paid circulator report, if applicable, to the secretary of state (secretary); and modifies the timing for a candidate to cure a nominating petition signature deficiency; Regarding notice and preparation of elections, requires the secretary to administer a pilot program that allows the county clerk and recorder or designated election official (clerk) of a county with at least 10,000 but fewer than 37,500 active electors and with at least 3 cities or towns where the second and third largest cities or towns that are located entirely within the county both have less than 3% of the active electors in the county, to request a waiver of the requirement to designate 3 voter service and polling centers (VSPC) on election day and instead designate at least 2 VSPCs on election day; repeals an obsolete provision specifying data to be used to determine the number of students enrolled at an institution of higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic; specifies that for a general election, a county shall establish a drop box on each campus of an institution of higher education located within the county that has 1,000, rather than 2,000, or more enrolled students; clarifies that each clerk is required to ensure that primary election ballots are printed in accordance with existing law; repeals obsolete language regarding voting equipment; updates several provisions regarding the use of voting systems to align with current practice; requires the secretary to approve or deny an application from a political subdivision to purchase a new electromechanical voting system within 30 days of receiving the application; modifies the standards for accessible voting systems to align with federal standards; and repeals obsolete language regarding direct recording electronic voting systems; Regarding election judges, changes the deadline by which the county chairperson of each major political party in a county is required to certify to the clerk the names and addresses of registered electors recommended to serve as election judges in the county and implements an appeal process for an election judge who is preemptively removed as an election judge by the county chairperson or authorized official; Regarding the conduct of elections, allows a registered elector who will not have been a Colorado resident for at least 22 days immediately before a presidential general election to cast a provisional ballot, which includes only a vote for president and vice president, in that election; extends the deadline for the secretary to adopt rules concerning the tabulation, reporting, and canvassing of results for a coordinated election using instant runoff voting conducted by multiple counties from January 1, 2025, to January 1, 2026; updates provisions regarding voting machines and the inspection of voting machines by election judges; repeals obsolete provisions regarding sample ballots, the seal on voting machines, the manner of voting by eligible electors, the counting of write-in ballots, and how voting system software is installed; clarifies that the secretary will conduct a random audit of voting devices only if a risk-limiting audit is not possible after an election; and extends the deadlines for the secretary to promulgate rules necessary to conduct risk limiting audits in an election using instant runoff voting and for a county to audit an election using instant runoff voting conducted as part of a coordinated election from January 1, 2025, to January 1, 2026; Regarding mail ballot elections, allows a clerk to request a waiver from the secretary of state exempting the county from the remote location drop box ballot collection requirements and specifies alternative collection requirements if a waiver is granted; specifies the conditions under which an elector may request a replacement ballot from the clerk; modifies the time by which an elector must request a replacement ballot from the clerk; and repeals obsolete provisions that direct clerks how to count ballots that are cast on electronic or electromechanical vote tabulating equipment; Regarding recounts, repeals obsolete provisions regarding recounts in nonpartisan local elections and clarifies who has standing to request a recount challenge; Regarding certificates of election and election contests, repeals obsolete language regarding the election of precinct officers and duplicative language regarding the resolution of tie votes and specifies that a contest concerning a presidential elector must be filed with the supreme court no later than 24 days after the general election and specifies the deadline for the supreme court to rule on such a contest; and Regarding recall elections, modifies the deadline for filing a nomination petition for a candidate to succeed an officer who is sought to be recalled. The act further modifies the code to specify that regarding the use of an all-candidate primary election or a ranked voting method in a primary or general election, it is the general assembly's intent that a general statutory provision with a later effective date prevails over a specific statutory provision with an earlier effective date. In addition, the act specifies that before a designated election official may conduct an all-candidate primary election using an all-candidate primary ballot and before a primary or general election can use a ranked voting method for federal or state offices, the secretary must certify that: Multiple municipalities in counties of specified sizes with active electors that satisfy certain demographic criteria have conducted an election with a ranked voting method; Each municipality that has conduced an election with a ranked voting method has completed a risk-limiting audit that demonstrates that the certified outcomes in each race were accurate; and The secretary has submitted a report to the general assembly regarding the impact of ranked choice voting methods as compared to elections conducted through other voting methods. The provisions of the act regarding an all-candidate primary election and the use of ranked voting methods take effect March 1, 2026. The act modifies the law regarding initiatives and referendums by repealing an obsolete provision regarding filing a paid circulator report with the secretary and by repealing obsolete language regarding the effective date of the bills enacted during the 2020 legislative session that included an act subject to petition clause. The act modifies the "Fair Campaign Practices Act" as follows: Prohibits a natural person who is not a citizen of the United States, a foreign government, or a foreign corporation from making a direct ballot issue or ballot question expenditure in connection with an election on a ballot issue or ballot question in the state; Specifies that a candidate seeking reelection does not have to file an additional disclosure statement filed pursuant to current law if the incumbent has filed the annual report required by law within the last 30 days from which the incumbent becomes a candidate for reelection; Clarifies that any person may file a complaint with the secretary of state about a candidate not complying with the disclosure statement requirements; and Requires a candidate for specified offices to amend the disclosure statement when there is a substantial change of interests as to which the disclosure is required. The act modifies the public official disclosure requirements specified in the "Colorado Sunshine Act of 1972" as follows: Requires that specified public officials file an annual disclosure statement with the secretary and amend the disclosure statement when there is a substantial change of interests as to which the disclosure is required; Requires specified public officials who are serving in office in the 2024 calendar year, but who have not filed an annual disclosure statement in the 2024 calendar year, to file a disclosure statement within a specified amount of time and requires the disclosure statements to be available on the secretary's website; Repeals a provision that allows a public official to file an income tax return with the secretary in lieu of filing certain information required in the disclosure statement; Allows any person who believes that a member of the general assembly is not complying with the public official's disclosure requirements to file a complaint with specified individuals, requires the secretary to notify the appropriate individuals if a member of the general assembly does not timely file the required annual disclosure statement, and requires an individual who receives a complaint to investigate the complaint using existing procedures. The act amends the "Colorado Open Records Act" to specify that if a clerk receives a request for election-related records that are in active use, in storage, or otherwise not readily available, and the request is made during an election for which the clerk is the designated election official, the clerk may take additional time to fulfill the request under certain circumstances; except that the allowance for additional time does not apply if the requester of the public records is a mass medium organization or a newsperson. The act adds clerk and recorders to the law specifying the office hours and required availability of county officials. The act amends Senate Bill 24-230, concerning support for statewide remediation services that positively impact the environment, to repeal the definition of "fee" applicable to section 20 of article X of the state constitution. These provisions of the act are contingent upon Senate Bill 24-230 being enacted and becoming law. The act modifies the county commissioner redistricting process to specify that staff working with the redistricting commission or the advisory committee assigned to assist the redistricting commission regarding the mapping of county commissioner districts may make a completed proposed redistricting plan that staff has prepared as a result of a request made in a public hearing available to the public on the commission's website. In addition, the act specifies that such staff may communicate with a member of the commission or advisory committee to clarify directions that were given to staff during a public meeting regarding the creation of a proposed plan, so long as staff makes a record of the communication available on the commission's website. The act makes the following appropriations for the 2024-25 state fiscal year: $10,444 to the department of revenue from the Colorado DRIVES vehicle services account in the highway users tax fund to implement the act; $1,888 to the office of the governor from reappropriated funds for use by the office of information technology to provide services to the department of revenue to implement the act; and $3,654 to the department of state from the department of state cash fund for use by the elections division to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE January 1, 2025 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE March 1, 2026(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/17/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/25/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/30/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
5/2/2024 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/5/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/6/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2024 Sent to the Governor
6/6/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-218Monitor Modernize Energy Distribution Systems C. Hansen (D) | S. Fenberg (D) / M. Duran (D) | K. Brown (D) The act requires the office of future of work to create a grant program, in coordination with the Colorado energy office, for lineworker apprenticeship programs (grant program). In connection with the grant program, the office of future of work must create a competitive application process and select apprenticeship programs that meet certain training and matching requirements. On July 1, 2024, the state treasurer must transfer $800,000 from the general fund to the Colorado lineworker apprenticeship grant program cash fund, which is created in the act, for the purposes of the grant program. The act also requires an investor-owned electric utility that serves 500,000 customers or more in the state (qualifying retail utility) to upgrade the qualifying retail utility's distribution systems as necessary to support the: Achievement of the state's beneficial and transportation electrification and decarbonization goals; and Implementation of federal, state, regional, and local air quality and decarbonization targets, standards, plans, and regulations (decarbonization targets and standards). In connection with these goals and decarbonization targets and standards, a qualifying retail utility is required to: Commence a data collection process to inform future energization timelines; Adopt certain cost caps; Propose to the public utilities commission (commission) the use of an optional flexible interconnection or energization tariff or phased interconnection or energization agreement by a customer as an alternative to system upgrades that would otherwise be required for interconnection or energization; and Establish a procedure for customers with a hybrid facility to complete the interconnection and energization process through a single application. A qualifying retail utility is required to identify interconnection and load hosting capacity for distributed energy resources for disproportionately impacted communities within its service territory. Prior to the establishment of a grid modernization adjustment clause, a qualifying retail utility shall recover forecasted investments placed into service and costs incurred for certain capital investment and operations and maintenance expenses (distribution activities) for a period of time ending on December 31, 2025. Recovery of the costs associated with the distribution activities must occur through the transmission cost adjustment clause or another existing adjustment clause, subject to certain conditions. Current law requires certain utilities to file a distribution system plan (plan) with the commission. The act also requires the plans of a qualifying retail utility to create sufficient hosting capacity across the qualifying retail utility's electrical distribution system to support the implementation of the decarbonization targets and standards and certain other laws, rules, plans, and policies. In developing a plan, a qualifying retail utility must consult with and provide opportunities to engage disproportionately impacted communities. As part of a plan proceeding, a qualifying retail utility is required to present at least 2 future planning scenarios with corresponding investments to show future different states of the distribution system. In evaluating a qualifying retail utility's plans, the commission must evaluate whether the plan satisfies certain criteria. In addition, the plan must include a performance-based framework, which must consist of certain specified components. A qualifying retail utility must include in the qualifying retail utility's plan an analysis of current and future qualified staffing levels necessary to comply with state laws regarding distribution system planning (adequate staffing levels). The commission must review whether each qualifying retail utility's plan has adequate staffing levels before the qualifying retail utility's plan may proceed. A qualifying retail utility must ensure that, in any projects undertaken to implement a plan, all labor is performed by the employees of the qualifying retail utility or by a contractor that meets certain labor requirements. The commission must open a rule-making, for a qualifying retail utility, to consider and establish rules regarding energization timelines; interconnection; interconnection, energization, and electrification of end uses; and maximum individual customer cost caps or fees. Subject to commission review and approval, a qualifying retail utility is required to recover certain projected costs related to distribution activities as part of the qualifying retail utility's plans. If the commission finds that the distribution activities benefit or advance the decarbonization targets and standards or state energy policy goals, recovery of the costs must occur through the grid modernization adjustment clause. For distribution system activities that do not benefit or advance the decarbonization targets and standards or state energy policy goals, recovery of the costs may occur through the grid modernization adjustment clause if the qualifying retail utility meets the criteria established in the performance-based framework in the qualifying retail utility's approved plan. A qualifying retail utility is required to make an annual grid modernization adjustment clause advice letter filing with the commission no later than November 1 of each year with an effective date of January 1 of the subsequent year. No later than February 1, 2025, a qualifying retail utility is required to create and file with the commission an application to implement a virtual power plant program, including a tariff for performance-based compensation for a qualified virtual power plant. The virtual power plant program and tariff must include and implement certain requirements. A qualifying retail utility may apply to recover certain business costs to facilitate a virtual power plant program through the grid modernization adjustment clause. By January 1, 2025, a qualifying retail utility is required to file a plan with the commission to implement programs for the undergrounding of utility distribution infrastructure (undergrounding) in nonfranchised areas of the qualifying retail utility in the state using 1% of the area's gross electric revenues from the prior year. A qualifying retail utility must also consider the public benefit of undergrounding and other community benefit investments in its plans. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $420,500 is appropriated from the public utilities commission fixed utility fund to the department of regulatory agencies for use by the commission as follows: $382,670 for personal services; and $37,830 for operating expenses. APPROVED by Governor May 22, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 22, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/24/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/29/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/30/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/30/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
5/4/2024 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/5/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/5/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/6/2024 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/9/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/10/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/22/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB24-233Monitor Property Tax C. Hansen (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | L. Frizell (R) Property tax revenue limit. Beginning with the 2025 property tax year, section 1 of the act establishes a limit on qualified property tax revenue, as defined by the act, for local governments (limit). This limit does not apply to local governments that are home rule municipalities, school districts, have not received voter approval to exceed the statutory 5.5% property tax revenue limitation, or have not received voter approval to collect, retain, and spend the majority of their property tax revenue without regard to the limitations in section 20 of article X of the state constitution. The limit is equal to the local governmental entity's base year qualified property tax revenue increased by 5.5% for each year since the base year including the relevant property tax year. A local government may seek voter approval to waive the limit. A local governmental entity's base year qualified property tax revenue is: For a local governmental entity that had qualified property tax revenue for the 2023 property tax year, the local governmental entity's qualified property tax revenue for the 2023 property tax year, plus any money the local governmental entity received from the state to compensate the local governmental entity for reduced property tax revenue in the 2023 property tax year; For a local governmental entity that did not have qualified property tax revenue for the 2023 property tax year, the local governmental entity's qualified property tax revenue for the first year that the local governmental entity has property tax revenue; or If applicable, the local governmental entity's qualified property tax revenue for the most recent property tax year for which the local governmental entity's voters approved temporarily waiving the limit. If a local government's qualified property tax revenue would otherwise exceed the limit, the local government shall either establish a temporary property tax credit equal to the number of mills necessary to prevent the local government's qualified property tax revenue from exceeding the limit or temporarily reduce its mill levy. Nonresidential real property valuation reductions. Under current law, for nonresidential property, the valuation for assessment (valuation) is 29% of the actual value of the property. However, certain categories of nonresidential property had temporarily reduced valuations for property tax 2023. Section 2 extends these temporarily reduced valuations to property tax year 2024. Section 2 also permanently reduces the valuations for commercial and agricultural property as follows: For property tax year 2025, the valuation is 27% of the actual value of the property; and For property tax years commencing on or after January 1, 2026, the valuation is 25% of the actual value of the property. Residential real property valuation reductions. For the 2024 property tax year, section 4 makes 2 reductions to residential real property valuation by continuing the 2023 property tax year reductions to residential real property valuation: For multi-family residential real property, section 4 reduces the valuation from 6.8% of the actual value of the property to 6.7% of the amount equal to the actual value of the property minus the lesser of $55,000 or the amount that causes the valuation for assessment of the property to be $1,000 (alternate amount); and For all other residential real property, section 4 reduces the valuation from an estimated 7.06% of the actual value of the property to 6.7% of the amount equal to the actual value of the property minus the lesser of $55,000 or the alternate amount. For the 2025 property tax year, section 4 modifies residential real property valuation so that the valuation for all residential real property is: For the purpose of a levy imposed by a school district, 7.15% of the actual value of the property; and For the purpose of a levy imposed by a local governmental entity that is not a school district, 6.4% of the actual value of the property. For the 2026 property tax year and all future property tax years, section 4 also reduces the valuation for all residential real property from 7.15% of the actual value of the property. For all residential real property, the valuation is: For the purpose of a levy imposed by a school district, the lesser of 7.15% of the actual value of the property or a percentage of the actual value of the property determined by the property tax administrator pursuant to section 7; and For the purpose of a levy imposed by a local governmental entity that is not a school district, 6.95% of the amount equal to the actual value of the property minus the lesser of 10% of the actual value of the property or $70,000 as adjusted for inflation in the first year of each subsequent reassessment cycle. Qualified-senior primary residence residential real property. Senate Bill 24-111 created a new residential real property subclass: qualified-senior primary residence residential real property. In addition to the other reductions for resdiential real property made in section 4, section 4 makes the following valuation reductions for qualified-senior primary residence residential real property: For property tax year 2025, for the purpose of a levy imposed by a local governmental entity that is not a school district, 6.4% of the amount equal to the actual value of the property minus either 50% of the first $200,000 of that actual value plus the lesser of 10% of the actual value of the property or $70,000 or the alternate amount; For property tax year 2026, for the purpose of a levy imposed by a local governmental entity, 6.95% of the amount equal to the actual value of the property minus either 50% of the first $200,000 of that actual value plus the lesser of 10% of the actual value of the property or $70,000 or the alternate amount; and For property tax year 2025, for the purpose of a levy imposed by a school district, 7.15% of the amount equal to the actual value of the property minus either 50% of the first $200,000 of that actual value or the alternate amount. Adjustable residential real property valuation. Section 7 requires legislative council staff to notify the state board of equalization of the first year after 2026 in which the local share of total program is equal to or greater than 60% of the total program determined pursuant to the "Public School Finance Act". For every property tax year after that year, the valuation for assessment for all residential real property, for the purpose of a levy imposed by a school district, is equal to the lesser of: 7.15% of the actual value of the property; or The percentage of the actual value of the property necessary for statewide school district property tax revenue divided by weighted total program to equal 0.6. Reimbursement of local governments. The state reimbursed local governmental entities for property tax revenue lost as a result of the reductions in valuation enacted in Senate Bill 22-238 and Senate Bill 23B-001. Section 9 establishes a reimbursement mechanism for certain local governmental entities other than school districts to account for property tax revenue lost as a result of the reductions in valuation in the act for the 2024 property tax year. The reimbursement mechanism requires the state to reimburse local governments in an amount equal to the decrease, if any, in assessed value between the 2022 and 2024 property tax years multiplied by the local governments' mill levy rate from the 2022 property tax year. Section 9 creates a fund out of which the state makes the reimbursements and requires the state treasurer to transfer to the fund $10,311,233 from the sustainable rebuilding program fund. Property tax deferral program. The existing property tax deferral program allows any person to defer the payment of the portion of real property taxes on the person's homestead that exceeds the tax-growth cap, which is an amount equal to the average of the person's real property taxes paid for the preceding 2 property tax years for the same homestead, increased by 4%. Beginning with the 2025 property tax year, section 10 removes the 4% tax-growth cap. Accordingly, beginning with the 2025 property tax year, a person may defer the payment of the portion of real property taxes on the person's homestead that exceeds the average of the person's real property taxes paid for the preceding 2 property tax years for the same homestead. Appropriation for state share of districts' total program funding. Beyond the appropriations in the act necessary for the administration of this act as outlined in sections 12 and 13, section 11 appropriates $378,861,731 to the department of education from the state education fund to cover the increases in the state share of districts' total program funding resulting from the assessed value reductions set forth in the act. APPROVED by Governor May 14, 2024 EFFECTIVE upon the date of the official declaration by the governor NOTE: This act does not take effect if either or both of the following occur at the next general election: An initiative that reduces valuations for assessment is approved by the people; An initiative that requires voter approval for retaining property tax revenue that exceeds a limit is approved by the people. If this act takes effect then this act takes effect upon the date of the official declaration of the vote for the general election held on November 5, 2024; except that section 3 of this act takes effect only if Senate Bill 24-111 does not become law, sections 4 and 8 of this act take effect only if Senate Bill 24-111 becomes law, section 6 of this act takes effect only if House Bill 24-1448 does not become law, and section 7 of this act takes effect only if House Bill 24-1448 becomes law. Senate Bill 24-111 was signed by the governor May 14, 2024. House Bill 24-1448 was signed by the governor May 23, 2024.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/6/2024 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/6/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/6/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/6/2024 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/7/2024 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2024 Introduced In House - Assigned to Appropriations
5/7/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/7/2024 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/8/2024 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/8/2024 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/10/2024 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2024 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2024 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/14/2024 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note